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Sands of Egypt 



Bomb Escape 



1020 Printer 

Handler 



Music Maker 



Carols 



HRI5THA5 CAROLS 



:>GL£ CELl^ 










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Bu//Ants 



Camelot 




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■ , Q&J*2fo , S^ ,,, ^£\St*r'36c 






JI*H 



JT^ 



....Flight of the Swan 



ATARI in 1985 - see page 8 

ARI USERS MAGAZINE AN ATARI USERS MAGAZINE AN ATARI USERS i 

.....GAMES ....... ATARI WflVS ...... ATARI:...... PROGRAN\S.......ATARTL^ REVIEWS.. 






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SEND SAE. FOR IFREE NEWS LETTER) THE NATURE OF THE BEAST". 



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HELL GATE 



111 Ell 



MfT*GAL*:TI€ MDUCTOB 

LLAMAS BATTLE 



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LASIHiOKf GHIDHUHNER SHEEP IN SPACE HUVtH BOVVER ATTACK gF THE BfVEKSF OF 

MLTTAaT CAMELS MJU TANT CUIUS 

siipis»[;i KO "55 &K **'/■*' 



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nt n uji uac am «t » in una tHt * zt u* «M ri X ycwiumwi <i« . * » m <xts retg «a uijim nm * a la i itu rsm uu» urnm/wi »«- injigjs fr» obm j^iuoi rs.n nuiunspi 
*m iu.iim Ha mo iLP.ti«ia Hi* cpmkiAWM M m«u*?in» jsm nHuiinniD n« uiw dm 

tlM hjHIiB 1 hi 



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^ iohn Mennri 



DEALERS may order direct from CBS Telesales 01 -960 21 55 quoting account number. LLA cod* number and QuarHilisS, Good* delivered within 46 hour* 



3 = 




Editor & Publisher = 



= Les Ellingham 



Printed by _ ISSUE 13 



Stafford Reprographics Ltd.= 



January/ February 1985 



Typesetting 
Budget Typesetting Ltd. I 

from copy set on an Atari I 
800 and transm itted by: 
modem, ■ 



Editorial & Advertising 



j/respondence 
PAGE 6 Magazine 
I P.O.Box 54 
Stafford 
ST16 1DR 



Listing Conventions, 

ARTICLES 

Turn of the Year. . . . . Les Eliingham 

LISTINGS 

Carols AJ.Costick 

Flight of the Swan Christopher Jephcott 

Bomb Escape Ron Smith 

Camelot Allan Knopp 

Bull Ants , Sydney Brown 

Music Maker Colin Failer 



PAGE 6 



is published 
| bi-monthly 



David & Mary Lynch 
. Geoffrey Thompson 



= ATARI™ is a registered 
Jrade mark of ATARI INC. ; 
= All references s hould be 
~iso noted. 



. Paga 6 is a u&eri magazine and relies ' 

entirety on readers' support in submitting \ 
j^riarTiGles and programs The aim is 10 ' 

Bnplore Atan computing through the : 

exchange of information and knowledge 
whilst we cannot unfortunately, pay 
for articles published, we hope that you : 
= will gain satisfaction from s*ajng your : 



■ wdrV oubhshed and in turn we hope — 



that you wilt team from uncles submitted 

- by othef readers 



■ Whilst we take whatever steps we can 

^m ensure the accuracv of articles and 
— programs and the contents of adver- 
tisements PAGE 6 cannot be hekl 
= r esponsible for aoy errors or claims 
: "* made by advertisers. . 



GOTO DIRECTORY 



8 



11 
14 
20 
24 
34 
47 



22 
50 



UTILITIES 

L a 1020 Printer Handler 

Rescue Mission boot tape maker. . . 

PROGRAMMING 

PMG in machine code Anthony Hughes 32 

REVIEWS 

Victagraph Plot Window Les Ellingham 31 

Music Maestro Please Phil Brown 36 

The Software Reviews . . , . . 40 

REGULAR COLUMNS 

ADVENTURE Garry Francis 18 

Editorial . . . , , 4 

Readers Letters 6 

Contact 38 

Typo Tables. 50 

BACK ISSUES 45 

49 



Subscription rates* annual (6 issues) 

U.K. £ 7.00 Outside Europe - Surface 

Europe £1 0.50 Outside Europe 



..£10.50 
Airmail .....£16.00 
Single copies and back issues at one-sixth of above rates. 
Please make cheques payable to PAGE 6. 



Please mention PAGE 6 when replying to advertisers. 



PAGE 6 ■ Issue 13 



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Touch Tablet and Atari Art 



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THE ULTIMATE POOLS PREDICTION PROQRAM 



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AVAILABLE (RETURN OF POST) FROM 



l^mwm 







37 COUNCILLOR LAME, CHEADLE, CHESHIRE. « 061-428 7425 



Welcome to another issue of PAGE 6 which hopefully 
will reach v ou before Christmas. As usual this issue has a 
slant towards games to keep you merry and occupied 
around Christmas and the New Year. Music is also 
associated with Christmas and you will find a music theme 
in this issue with comments on Pokey Player and 
Advanced Music System 11 as well as Carols for you to 
type in. If you prefer to make your own music then Music 
Maker will let you use your keyboard as a piano or 

organ. 

Unfortunately those of you with only 16k memory will 
not be able to play Flight of the Swan, our other 
competition winner or Camelot but 1 hav/e included other 
listings which will run in 16k Although it is easy for me to 
say, as I don't have to pay for It®, I would strongly 
recommend anyone with 16k to upgrade their machine 
to 48k for it really does open up a whole new world. Quite 
apart from the many more commercial programs that will 
become available to you, programs from PAGE 6 such as 
RESCUE MISSION emd CAMELOT, which cost you 
nothing, will make it well worth while. Whilst it is possible 
to write good programs in 16k, many of the programs 
which have been submitted to us do require at least 32k 
as the programmers have used so many of the facilities of 
the Atari that something would have to be sacrificed to fit 
into 16k If you did not get an upgrade for Christmas try 
and persuade someone to buy you one, or save up 
yourself. You won't regret it. 

At last things seem to have started moving from Atari 
and you should be well aware of Atari advertising by the 
time you read this We all wish Atari every success over 
Christmas and for 1985 and, if the optimism of the people 
at Atari is anything to go by. Atari will be back at the top 
quite soon. 

Finally, as we reach the end of another year, 1 would like 
to thank everyone who has sent in programs, articles or 
bits and pieces for publication. Every contribution, 
whether published or not is much appreciated. We are 
still a small circulation magazine and rely entirely on your 
enthusiasm and love of your Atari in providing other 
owners with a good reason to stick with and enjoy their 
Atari computers. If you have not been able to make any 
contribution yourself, you have an opportunity now to 
show your appreciation of the efforts of others by voting 
in the annual Readers Poll. Please turn to the centre pages 
for further information 

May 1 wish all of you the very best for 1985. Stick with 
Atari and keep reading PAGE 61 



A^&o cM^kJ^^ — 



Editor 









PAGE 6 - Jssue 13 



FIRST 
STEPS o] 

from Jtp 

BAUG SOFTWARE 




* * THE GRAPHICS TUTORIAL * * 

A beginner's introduction to the ATARI Graphics to 
8. This tu to rial will guide you through the maze of text 
and colour, modes and tb solutions, with enough 
explanations and examples to help but not confuse. 

* * THE MEMORY TUTORIAL * * 

All the memory locations - and more - that the 
beginner could wish to have In order to enhance 
programs. PART ONE is an Introduction to 
MEMORY. PEE Ks POKE* etc. in simple terms, PART 
TWO contains the locations and examples showing 
their use, PARTS ONE AND TWO ARE INCLUDED 
IN THIS TUTORIAL 

* * THE MOVEMENT TUTORIAL* * 

The beginner's guide to the basics of animation, from 
simple PRINT to screen memory routines. All written 
in BASIC for easy understanding. This tutorial does 
not Include PMG animation. 

AVAILABLE ON DISK OR CASSETTE 
£6.00 each including: p. & p- 

BAUG SOFTWARE, 
P.O.BOX 123, BELFAST, BT10 ODB 



P. F. SOFTWARE 

presents 
for ATARI 400,600XL800.800XL 

ART ATARI (16k). Create graphic masterpieces with your Atari. 
Up to 80 different colours can be displayed at once. Uses Hi' Res 
graphics mode 7.5. Pictures can he saued to 'ape for re-display 
Demonstration picture provided, £4.50 

BLACKJACK (1 6k). Features realistic Hi- Res card display Can 
you break the hank? £2.50 

PICTURE PUZZLE (32k). Watch the picture jumble itself up 

Can you recreate the oriyinal picture? Two Hi-Res pictures to choose 
from. Original picture can be recalled while solving the puzzle. 20 
difficulty levels. £3.50 



* NEW • NEW * NEW * 

PICTURE TORMENT (16k) Even harder than 'PlCTURF. 
PUZZLE'. The picture is split into horizontal and vertical column* which 
are rotated '"Ruhik style' 1 It te then up to you to sort it out! Single or 
double column (very difficult) option. Original picture recall. 20 different 
levels. Includes bonus program to design your own pictures for us# in 
the puzzle. 

£3.50 

Prices Include 1 p&p. 



Cheques and P.G.'s to 



P. R Software 

14 Kirk stall Avenue 

Llttleborough 

LancsOL15 9JA 



Listing Conventions 

The program listings in PAGE 6 are prepared 
so that the listings match exactly what you 
see on a normal 38 column screen. Inverse 
video and CONTROL characters appear as 
they do on the screen. 

To obtain CTRL characters use the key 
shown in the following chart 



¥ 


CTRL , 


c 


r 


CTRL A 


i: 


1 


CTRL D 


i 


J 


CTRL C 


a 


H 


CTRL D 


:i 


n 


CTRL E 


3 


/ 


CTRL F 


B 


\ 


CTRL G 


k? 


J 


CTRL H 


r 


■ 


CTRL I 


r 


k 


CTRL J 


i 


■ 


CTRL K 


L 


■ 


CTRL L 


J 


^ 


CTRL M 


■ 


_ 


CTRL H 


■ 


■ 


CTRL D 


1 


■* 


CTRL P 


E 


r 


CTRL a 


n 


- 


CTRL R 


5 


+ 


.CTRL S 


■■ 

■■ 


• 


CTRL T 


□ 


■ 


CTRL U 


■ 


\ 


CTRL V 


1 


T 


CTRL H 


■■ 


A 


CTRL K 


■i 


1 


CTRL ¥ 


1 


L 


CTRL Z 


E 


♦ 


CTRL . 


□ 


4 


CTRL ; 


G 


1 


SHIFT = 


II 


1 


ESC ESC 




t 


ESC CTRL 


- 


4 


ESC CTRL 


— 


** 


ESC CTRL 


+ 


■* 


ESC CTRL 


* 


1 


ESC SHIFT CLEAR 


4 


ESC DELETE 


i 


E5C TAB 




□ 


ESC SHIFT 


DELETE 


U 


ESC SHIFT INSERT 


Q 


ESC CTRL 


TAB 


B 


ESC SHIFT TAD 


a 


ESC CTRL 


2 


CI 


ESC CTRL 


DELETE 


u 


ESC CTRL 


INSERT 



Make sure that you SAVE a copy of any 
listing before you attempt to RUN iL 



Readers Letters 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Dear PAGE 6, 

I note with interest your reply to Mr 
Spencers request for reviews of copy 
programs in issue 10. While 1 under- 
stand your position, I feel you should 
reconsider. While you are undoub- 
tedly correct in assuming that certain 
individuals will misuse a copy utility, 
and that some will do so grossly as in 
the example you quoted, it is also true 
that there are legitimate and worth- 
while uses for such software. By 
assuming the worst of your sub- 
scribers, you tar both the guilty and 
the innocent with the same brush. In 
a country where the accused is ass- 
umed to be innocent until proven 
guilty, this seems to me to be rather 
unfair and not a little insulting. 

Having recently up-graded to disk, 
I find myself with over 30 games, all 
original and paid for, which are vir- 
tually redundant due to excessive 
loading times and the unreliability of 
the Atari tape decks. I would dearly 
like to transfer some or all of these to 
disk - to have to buy them a second 
time would really hurt! - and as far as I 
am aware I would be within my legal 
rights to do so. 

While most software companies 
refuse to provide back-up copies of 
their products at a reasonable price, 
and while floppy disks and tapes 
continue to be such vulnerable forms 
of storage, I would suggest that there 
is a strong case favouring the avail- 
ability of copy programs to even the 
average user. I am interested in the 
Atari version of Visicalc despite the 
very high price, but 1 am reluctant to 
purchase it with the knowledge that a 
speck of dust in the wrong place 
could leave me over £100 out of 
pocket. 

Finally I would like to point out that 
by reviewing copy utilities you would 
not be condoning their misuse neither 
would you be increasing their avail- 
ability. You would, however be 
rendering your subscribers the valu- 
able service of steering them clear of 
programs which offer bad value for 
money. I will probably acquire copy 
programs for the reasons that 1 have 



stated, with or without your advice. 
With your advice I will have more 
chance to obtain the program that 
will suit my needs best. I believe that 
many of your readers will be in the 
same position and that we could 
benefit from your advice. 

Alan Sharpies, 
Cumbria 

°°A very succinctly put arguement, 
Alan, whose main points I entirely 
agree with, I see no problem in a 
responsible person purchasing a copy 
utility for the purpose of transferring 
already purchased cassettes to disk 
or backing up expensive software in 
case of damage. If a copying utility 
existed that did that and nothing 
more. I would not hesitate to review 
and recommend it The problem is of 
course that copying utilities can't be 
controlled in thai way and the number 
of purchasers that have NEVER cop- 
ied something that they don't own is 
fairly small The trouble is the tempt- 
ation of it all. Once somebody has 
copied something, surely it can't do 
any harm to make just one more 
copy? 

The scale of copying on the Atari 
in this country is enormous, probably 
more than on any other computer. 
There are software libraries where 
you can hire programs on disk or 
cassette that are only legally available 
on ROM. You can hire expensive 
programs without manuals {in case 
they get tatty) on brand name disks 
{incase the original gets damaged). If 
you know the right people, you can 
get a copy of any program available 
for the Atari, including programs not 
yet officially released. If you like you 
can have half a dozen on one disk. 
By reviewing copy utilities I give 
publicity to those producing them 
S eoera I of t hese pe ople alsop rodu ce 
cartridge back-up utilities. There is 
no possible justification for backing 
up a cartridge, you may just as well 
go out and get an electronics rip- off 
merchant to back up your computed 
The unfortunate fact is that many 
people producing back-up utilities 



do so in the full knowledge and 
expectation thai they will be used for 
pirating software. Why should they 
care? They are making their money 
anyway. 

Sowhat is the harm of a few copies 
floating around? Does it really affect 
you? Yes, itdoes. Take a walktoyour 
nearest computer dealer and look 
round for some of the "1000's" of 
programs available for the Atari 
Chances are you won't find any. 
There are countfess retailers who no 
longer sell imported Atari software 
simply because it did not sell. It did 
not sell because too many people 
found it too easy to get a pirated 
copy. There are software producers 
in this country that started off on the 
Atari an d ui rtuaily went broke beca use 
copies of their games were so easily 
available. Those who survived 
switched over to the Commodore 
and found that they could sell TEN 
times as much. They are not people 
making obscene profits, hut needing 
to make some profit just to live I 
could go on but the evidence is there, 
in retail shops around the country 
and in the magazine advertisements, 
or rather the lack of them. 

There are probably more aware 
and honest readers amongst the 
PAGE 6 subscribers than for any 
other magazine but there are also 
those who either don't care or who 
could easily succumb to the tempt- 
ation given the information. If I 
review copying utilities, the producers 
will prosper and some readers at 
least will be tempted down the pirate 
path directly as the result of the 
review. The Atari world is pretty 
fragile at the moment and I don't 
want to take the responsibility for 
inflicting any more wounds, i have 
seen too much damage done to 
honest retailers, many of whom were 
{still are?) dedicated Atari fans. 

I fully respect those of you who 
want copying utilities for entirely 
proper purposes and mean no offence 
by the stand that PAGE 6 takes. I 
don't know the answer, /can only see 
the problems. 










ATARI 800 48K OUT OF STOCK 

AuW 

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SEE TEXT SECTION 2 



■MO 1SK GAMES MACHINE 











EVERYTHING YOU WANT FROM A HOME COMPUTER 

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belitue that the JKMXL cannot bv beaten. Compare Atari with the competil»on. juat look at these specificationj:;- 
COLOUR CAPABILITIES. Ifi colours and 1ft mtensiEica giving 25*. ifife-enl colours lall ol 11* 35* ColOura ran EM displayed at Ihe iimi lima,. 
QPFHATINa srETEal: 24K POM intsudnifl Atari FLisic programming; language and a HI1 fnagnnslic last program 

Kt ye AH l>: Tul •drrohn de*-3*i wim fir koya including helu key Bid 4 special function keys., 'I'lein-SUonal uhu'ULiei &el 3 id ?S gre»phici hoys. 
SOUND! J mdepanmnt sound aynineinere SBCA capable & producing music ecrou A 3'AOCtlV» rang? or a widfl tanvty ol special sound enact*. ^floVtKWH 
urograrrmirH} can achieve an octavo- r»ng» o« irji to nine- aclmill 

DISPLAY: 1 1 graphic, modns and i text mooes. Up IP 320 »1 92 resolulion Mfij irnuirt lent disnUs 2* Jmes by *0 columrn 

SPECIAL ATARI IN TLGflATEO CIRCUITS: S"TI A lor grammes ^tsLplay Ppkaiy tor sound an-rjcdntrpllar peril Arlicforsc-OBficonl'dl Brldl/fl Mnpul.-'Outpul) 
CPU- &&S2C m-sioprocessor - DSD microsecaod cycle and a LioCh Speed af 1.7s MHi 

EXTENDED GRAPHICS FUNCTIONS: High resolution g raphici M-.ihi coloured charade* so-1 Sottware screen awdch ing Vulliple r-»*>r>n«d CMr«her sat*. 
Player nnaai-e (Stxtta) graphics. Tina scioen scrolling Clunofiflme colour regiaiers SftXMMh uha,acie* movement Sample cijloor e/umaho-n radilies 
PROGRAMMING FEATjnES: E-b-li In Alarl Hasic programming language suppo/li-ng paak. poke and u£R p<ls at leaat ftolher iBrtuivfigv* available The harip 
kfty w" promje additional intoi-nal o-i and menu tcrsefia with, ctnam aotlwafe Full on-ecre#n editing it available- ai wall as syntax GrtocAinp; on entiy 
INPUT.-OuTPuT: E* lev rial processor h"S tor expansion wilh memory and peripherals, Cornpoo.rle video monilar outpul Ferrpheril port t-o-r dirnd cDnnactipp 
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HCATPl Manngfi-Tflnl 1 Programminp J'dS Thei'e is alpo APK |Atpn Program E*CtMjnge) and fy\ cou#a* Alan's ramrjua antarlaiimer! aohwarfr *i0v« al only 
t£ 96 In addition ihere Kia'iQSBol supiiart and t**lp available \*w apwiialiat Atari mapaiineshke Ailtic and Ai'ifllOfl and from o^ar 75.*.1a/ib«ites/manuBis 

t ATARI 400 18K GAMES MACHINE - £H: Wn ha.ua Wmvtt t Atari 400 -games ciinsolns/campultia with 16K HAM. The- prue- is t?9 ilor a 
recond 1(1 oied modal t or £39 for a new machine. &0II1 come with l! monlha guarantes The Atari 400 can play all fJOOXL HOM carttidga 
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3LATAF1I 1010 PROGRAM RECORDER • £34: For low coat storage and retrieval capability. Data transmission W0 baud S-inmyt: uap^iji ily 
1Q0K t>yt«* on a aiaty m inula cassette. Track conliguraliem tqur (rack, two cfiannrjl* (riicjitat and audio-l. Aulo recorfl/piaybacit/pauw 
ccntrol/urvique aoundth'rough hvollty Built in accidental eraauie prewention, automatic shutoff and 3 digit laps countar 

4.ATARI 10SD DUAL PEfiStTY DISK DRIVE - £l»; SJJ" disk* Holding 127K randomly accessible byte* pfpuide both eKpantutHi and' 
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auipmatically given a FREE sel of 100 programs am 3 Duk* recardetj oa bolh side*. 

i. ATARI 1DZD COLOUR PRINTER * £9fc Pointer and Ploiier with lour' colour graphic print capability. 40 column width pxinti-iy at 10 
characters per seccmd C«" print S, 10and 3D characters per inch. 64 cftaraeter aiiea. Prints text in 4 directions Ch<iie» of tine lypea. 

6. ATARI 101T LETTER QUALITY PRINTER - £*49; For word processing letters in professional typ*. Prm1 jpeed oiaocharapef second. 

T. ATARI TOUCH TAHLET - £49; Enables you IP oVaw arid paint pieturason ypur T.V Mteen, with the toucli of a stylus. 

B. ATARI TRAK BALL CONTROLLER - £19.95: Enables cursor movement In any direction and adds arcade realism to your games. 

t. ATARI SUPER CONTROLLER -£8,95: The ulnmale joystick with double firebullonloajiviyou* greileweorripetiiiueedoepn your games 



SILICA SHOP ARE THE No1 ATARI SPECIALIST 

I Silica Shop ar«nnuw lirmly estatHiahed as the No 1 Atari retail/mailorder and wholesale specialist in the U.K. We already offer uur service to 
ov*r 130,000 customers, 10,000 of whom have purchased Atari Home Computers Because we specialise (and wilh a turnover of £1 5 
mlllHHi). we are able to keep prices low by bulK purchase, Riny one ot Our 45 staff and we will ^e glad to be of service lo you C^nnplata the 
coupon below and we will Bend you our Atari pack with our le page price Hat and XL colour catalogue' 

I EKTENOCD TWO YE. AH GUARANTM: vVa are SH Alarl Service Contra, able 1o service and repair Atari oquipmant and hare added a 1? month BUirantaa to 1ho 
*r oharod by Atari giving yOu a lull ? year guaranlta on. your new XL comoulaf 

I SPECIALIST SUPPORT: Oat (ectiilcal Itaff ara alwaya available on the Hlephone Id help and advise vOU We endeavour to hold alocka ul evary 4reri 
Gompahtli* item available- in ma U.K amt we SlOCh Over TS A1*n two* 5. arm manuals 

' AFTER SALES SERVICE: vVh*n you purttiiS* your equipment 1rom Silica, your name villi b* autpmalically added Id Our iralilirig llBt VQU will than rrcoiw priLe 
isls. ll»»mHimr and delfljlt. Of now ralaasc s and davelopmentl. aa welt as SpKiSl dfara nhich are ajokisr.* Id Silica Atari Compuler Owne<S 
LOW PRICES; Our prices Include- VAT amd aro aalrerMly eompetihtffl We *i|l noraiBllv melon *nf lower prica oHafad hy our coripelitprB 
FREE COMPUTER OWNERS CLUEk Tits is Open to all Alan computer owners irraspectrifli ol vitiexa you pu-chaaed y-u-j' equ'pmem Memnarship is. FREE anil 
onMlei you to reCei»« bulletins giving details ol now raleaees SfW developmerita Send no* 10' your FREE. imormaho<i pack, prico list A eo*&u' cada^oaM* 
pa v HERT We eccapl cash , cheques, poatal Otfla'a Sfld Bll Credit Ca rda We »lao o'far r.rtim 1ac.ili1its owar 1 1 or S yaara. pieaw w lie tBf fl wrirtan quolaliori. 
MEXT DAV DELlVERy - rlHEE; All flOOde de*p»t^hBd 1rom Silica Shop era norma My sont by li rsl class posl or parcel p<»1 FflE E OF CHARGE As a spoci al inl'Oductory 
..".,> i-.:- e Iit Iftrr period only we w«M ba «jndin& ell Compulers and Oisk Drives hy a o*ke day Sacuncor dehwry service al »jr EMHI espansa 

i So IHI In the coupon below wlltt a |l|»r»tui-e enquiry or ordef and begin Id experience a ■pedilla! Atari sarvlce that It second to none 



SILICA SHOP LTD, V4 The Mews, Halherte,' Road, Sidcup, Kent, DA14 4DX Tel: 01-308 1111 

ORDER NOW-OR SEND FOR A FREE COLOUR BROCHURE 



I 



To: SILICA SHOP LTD, Dept PSIX 0185, 1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Road 
Sidcup, Kent, DA14 4DX Telephone: 01-3091111 



LITERATURE REQUEST 



L~2 Please Mrid rn* yriur FREE colour brochures and 16 page price lis! on Alari Compulejr*- 

O lrjwn;i -,,.. Videogame C I own a Compuler 



I 



Mr/Mrs/Ms: 
Addret-t: 



Initials- 



Surname . 



Postcode: 



I 
I 



QH DF ft REQUEST: 



PLEASE SEND ME: 

O MQXL 64K Compuler , »M 

D 4D D ,fk aames Machine ... «9.'"£j9 

O 1010 Program Recorder £34 

Q 1050 137K Disk Drive £1*9 



□ 1 nao 4 Colour Primer £99 

□ Ulrtr Quality Printer £141 

□ Touch Tablet - Cartrldse , £49 

D Trak Ball . . 119,95 

Q Super Controller «■»* 



ALL PRICES QUOTED AfiE INCLUSIVE OF VAT POSTAGE a PACKING IS FREE OF CHARGE 



D I enclose Cheque-'P-O. payable to Silica aVhop Limited for ih*- following amount £ 

D CREDIT CARD - Pleas* debit my: 

AcctM/Barclayeard/Vlta,' American Exprasa/Dlnert Club Card Number 



I 
I 



8 



News and Views 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Turn of the Year 



This time last year I wrote an article entitled Turn of the 
Year which took a look back at the year just ending. The 
year which is now drawing to a close has not been a par- 
ticularly good one for Atari a n d the i r followers so t h is ti me 
let's cast an eye forward 

Over the past couple of months there have been many 
rumouTS about what Atari will be doing next year, much of 
it pure speculation, so to try and give you a factual report 
of what you will see from Atari in 198 5 f I spoke to Jon 
Dean, Computer Products Manager in the U.K. Market- 
ing Division. Sounding positive and enthusiastic about 
the future he told me "It is Atari's intention to provide the 
very latest technology at very competitive prices". Some 
of you may feel that that is just good sales talk so read on 
to find out what Atari will be doing in 1985. 

To start with let's take a look at what Atari are doing 
now. Most importantly they are advertising, and spending 
£2 - 3 million up to Christmas, to make people aware of 
Atari They readily admit that they may not come out on 
top oyer Christmas but part of the campaign is to make 
people aware once again of the Atari name so that the 
new products to be introduced in 1985 will get off to a fly- 
ing start. During 1 985 they will be spending considerably 
in excess of the present advertising budget to bring new 
products to the home and business markets and are likely 
with their new 16-bit machine, to create a new and excit- 
ing 'middle' market that will blur the lines between home 
and business use. 

The Company will operate on three levels in future. 
They wtll continue to support the XL series and will 
introduce refinements to the range. I put to Jon Dean the 
recent report of a 1 28k 800XL but he was unable to con- 
firm or deny this when we spoke as no details or specifica- 
tions had been provided to Atari in the U.K. New products 
will be introduced and Atari is actively encouraging third 
party software producers as well as planning some titles of 
their own, Although termed the "lower-end" market, the 
XLs will not be thought of as entertainment only 1 
machines The entertainment side will not be overlooked 
but there will shortly be a range of General Business 
applications and a range of Educational software which 
will subject only to memory restrictions, be compatible 
with the XL and the 400/800 computers. Some of these 
titles will be Atari's own but most will be produced by third 
parlies with the full support of Atari 

Of immediate interest to disk drive owners is the immi- 
nent release by Atari of a disk based Adventure set in 
sleazy down- town New Jersey". Titled THE PAYOFF it 
is a text adventure intended to keep you busy for 
weeks or months. 

Continued support of the present range will be what 
many of you are looking for but the really exciting 
developments will be in the' middle market where for the 
first time Atari will really close the gap between the serious 



home user a n d the sm al I b u siness . To be introduce d at the 
CES show in the States in January and expected here in 
Apri 1/ May wi 1 1 be a n e w 1 6 - b it machine very si milar to t h e 
Apple Mackintosh but in colour. It will be driven by TOS- 
the Tramiel Operating System - and be supported with a 
disk drive, probably 3V& inch, and a monitor. The price for 
this machine? Around £400. The latest technology at 
very competitive prices The machine will be fully sup- 
ported with peripherals such as memory expansions 
allowing storage in Megabytes. 

What about software? Atari are supporting develop- 
ment of software from some of the major U.K. producers 
currently working in the 16-bit field to provide general 
business programs as well as specific business applications 
There will also be entertainment software and educational 
software including programs currently being developed 
at University level 

Sadly, but understandably, this machine will not be 
compatible with any of the present Atari machines but at 
the proposed price there is a strong case for the serious 
user to either trade in their present system or run two 
systems! For the first time truly serious* applications will 
be available to the ordinary home user but if you only 
used the 16-bit machine for top-class entertainment at 
first the enormous potential for wider use will be there. 
Dorit forget many of us paid almost this much for a 400 
and considerably more for an 800 Imagine Star Raiders 
in 16-bit! Imagine also switching straight over to a 
Megabyte database! 

Can there be more? At the top end Atari is expected to 
introduce in late summer a 32-bit machine to take the 
larger business market by storm. Look for the best 32- bit 
machine around at the moment. Would you buy it at one- 
fifth of the price? That is what Atari are hoping to make 
possible in 1985. 

Those are the three sides of the new Atari. A company 
which now recognises that the UK. and European 
markets are distinct from the U.S. XL machines will be 
assembled in Ireland from December and full manu- 
facture of all machines for the European market is 
expected there around Spring. No more product shortages 
because the U.S. has to come first. 

Jon Dean said I was spot on with the Editorial a couple 
of issues ago when I said "Atari is dead. Long live Atari 1 '. 
The Company that we all despaired over during the past 
couple of years is gone. In its place is a vibrant new Atari 
that will continue to support existing products and bring 
to the world the very best computing technology that we 
have come to expect from the name Atari. 



by Les Eilingham 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



AATARr ZOOMSOFT 



SOFTWARE 
SPECIALIST 




MR. COOL - 6e ready for a 
new addiction thai will be 
going around soon: "Mr. Cool- 
rnania." This challenging new 
game will have people 
do^gmg fireballs and springs 
in their sleep A faslmoving, 
smootnly animated game that 
will keep you busy for hours. 





GILS WELL - An addictingly 
fun arcade game lhat will 
gobble its way to your heart. 
Drill underground to find oil 
deposits while avoiding the 
nasty creatures that can 
destroy yout oi) pipe. Multiple 
screens and changing levels oi 
difficulty 




The PROTECT 

The PROTECT allows you to 
write to both sides of any disk 
Write protect without 
LABEL'S. No more cutting of 
notches that cause disk errors. 
Just plugs in. No soldering, 
takes only a few minutes to 
install. 

Price £9.95 



DISK COLLECTOR 
DISK COLLECTOR is a 
complete disk cataloging 
system. 13 options to choose 
from. Stores over 900 
filenames. No more going to 
DOS to see whats on each disk 
Run files. LOAD files. A must 
for all programmers. 

Price £9,95 



BASIC COMMANDER 

Single keystrokes allow you to LIST. 
SAVE, ENTER, LOAD or RUN files. 
You never need to type DOS again. 
View the entire disk directory, 
RENAME, LOCK, UNLOCK, even 
FORMAT disks from BASIC. 
Automatic line numbering, block 
delete, re-numbering. Also 3 keys 
for you to program. 
Price £24 95 



GAMES 
ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 

The HULK cass 8.75 

The HULK disk 13.25 

BRODERBUND 

ORQL disk 24.95 

LODE RUNNER disk 24.95 

SPARE CHANGE disk 24.95 

CALISTO 

WARLOCK cass 13.25 

WARLOCK disk 13.25 

CHANNEL a 

GOLDEN BATON 

CO SMI 

SLINKV 

SLINKY 

AZTEC CHALLENGE cass 8.95 

DATAMOST 

MR. ROBOT disk 21.95 

DATASOFT 

BRUCE LEE cass 12 95 

BRUCE LEE disk 12 95 

DALLAS QUEST disk 12.95 

FIRST STAR 

BOULDER DASH cass 20 95 

BOULDER DASH disk 20.95 

BRISTLES cass 20.95 

BRISTLES disk 20 95 

FLIP FLOP cass 20 95 

FLIP FLOP disk 20.95 

FUNSOFT 

FLAK disk 1495 

SNOKIE cass 1095 

SNOKIE disk 13.95 



cass 8.95 

cass 8.95 
disk 12.95 



GAMES 
GAMESTAR 

STAR LEAGUE B/B disk 
INFOCOM 

ZORK 1 disk 

ZORK 2 disk 

ZORK 3 disk 

LIAMASOFT 

GRIDRUNNER cass 

MICROPROSE 
SPITFIRE ACE cass 

SPITFIRE ACE disk 

SOLO FLIGHT cass 

SOLO FLIGHT disk 



23.00 

24.95 
24.95 
27.95 

7.50 

8.95 
1195 

12.95 
1295 



UTILITIES 

O/SYSTEMS ACTION cart 66 95 

MAC/65(OS/A+) disk 57.95 

BASIC XL cart 66 95 

MMG 

BASIC DEBUGGER disk 25.95 

BASIC COMMANDER disk 25 95 

MAIL LIST disk 34.95 

TRONIX 

S.A.M. disk 41.95 

P.M. ANIMATOR disk 25.95 

TELETARI disk 27.95 

PENGUIN 

GRAPHICS MAG disk 44 75 



ALL THE LATEST AMERICAN TITLES NOW IN STOCK 100 S OF TITLES 
TO CHOOSE FROM WRITE OR TELEPHONE FOR A FREE 
CATALOGUE NOW NO OBLIGATION IF YOU HAVE TROUBLE Jm 

FINDING A TITLE THEN DON T HESITATETO CALLUS WE 
KNOW THE ATARI BEST. 



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HAVE AN ADVENTURE THIS CHRISTMAS WITH LEVEL 9 




"The appearance of a ^=^ 
new program from Level 9 is 
a flag-day for all aspiring adven 
^t— 4 rures and, in my household, a sigr 
Vr or the cat to hide under the bed for tri 
duration againstthe inevitable moment 
when I go rampaging through the fiat, a wile 
look In mv eves muttering ferociously aDout bricklaying" 
birds nudist beaches and the iike. Since Return to Eden. 
the sequel to snowball is out. the cat may be in 
hiding until Christmas. 

Vou don't need to nave played snowball 
to get into the sequel as ever, there is 
ample documentation with the tape 
which in my Com mod ore 64 vers ion 
(it is also on the spectrum. Amstrad 
and BBC l. is turbo- loaded, it starts 
with you. agent Kim Kimherly, having . 
been framed for sabotaging 
the colonyship Snowball, in a 
crashed stratoglider 
on the planet Eden. For 
the moment your mis- 
sion is to survive the 
misplaced retributior^ * 
by your own people.. ^ 
b u 1 1 if e g ets very uS>' [ 
much more #" 

complicated man that 
Solving these t\ ^ 
puzzles has ^J\ A ™ ** 
nothing to ,V4.vl. 
do with luck 
you either 
figure your?" 
way out of £*, 
trouble { ■-. \*®r 
on Eden V 
or die there 1 : 
One major' 
difference r, 
Detween 



r\ 






\: 



"this and former 
Level 9 efforts is that the 
Spectrum and C64 versions 



^ 








■ 

have graphics of a very high quality andi 1 ) 
can be switched off if required. The scope' 1 , 
of the vocabulary appears unscathed by 
this addition. 

Even experienced adventurers 
will probably get fried a few times 
by the aveng i n g engi nes of th e 
Snowball, before discovering how to take 
shelter. But, once that hurdle is passed. 
the real adventure begins, and its a lum 
From the radioactive desert causedty 
the engine blast, you progress through 
a variety of hazards through some higtiiy 
unlikely locations 

I ha ven t got to tnat point yet. and so tat 
fc superhuman willpower has stopped 
me using the clue sheet 
provided, but I camt 
hold out very 
much longer 
since lamhavirjg 
whatcouiUDe 
lethal communi- 
, cation problems 
with some rooott. 
Terrific fun. but 
should carry j 
mental heaitli 
warning: 
Popular 
Comput- 
ing 
•jweem 

7tVOi 






M j,4£J 



::\ 



rt« 





COLOSSAL ADVENTURE The classic 

uui>ifr;imf qjmf. wnrn Jt> 
tjonut rooms. 

ADY£ NTUPE QUEST An epc puzzle 
jourriry through Miflfli? E ar*en 

i DUNC-EOH ADVENTURE *0 trnrJiufe* 
co find and 10D ■ puzzles so solve I 

I sncwSau |ifnivi**hsf Science 

Fiction game w rt". direr 70GC locations I 

WETURMTOEDEN VtgeTWijn 

aauwturt Hftmsiraa C6m M ina 
5p*ctrum v**(icin? hji« J4uolr,ruresi 

LORDS- OF TIME (maglnacMe ramp 
ttirough World Hu-tory 



BBC or 

: HV::.: 



I ENCLOSE A CHEQUE, PO FOR E9.95 
PER CASSETTE OR £1 1 .95 PER DISK 

My name: 

My address: 




I 



i 



£Rik The viking Family game For 
BBC CBM 6fl amd ^DFClrum only 
am wiTh ISO- pictures. 



□ 



My micro is 

[one of those listed below with 
at least 3210. Send coupon to: 

LEVEL 9 COMPUTING 

Dept tf. 229 Hughe rid en Road 
High Wycombe, Bucks. HP13 5P0 



I 



AMSTRAD BBC CBWI64 SPECTRUM MEMOTECH NASCOM ATARI 



PAGE 6 ■ Issue 13 
Music 



11 



CAROLS 



Brighten up Christmas with a selection of Carols. This program presents a 
menu of well known carols or Christmas music which you can choose by 
selecting a letter or which will automatically play through. The sound of the 
music can be altered to your liking by holding down or pressing the Space bar 
or the OPTION and SELECT keys. Keep pressing these keys for different 
effects. 

The program will automatically check the data to ensure that you have 
typed it correctly and will prompt you for a cassette or disk copy. If cassette is 
chosen, the program will create a boot tape which can be run by holding down 
the START key whilst turning the computer on. Disk users will have a file 
named CAROL which should be loaded from Option Lon the DOS 2 menu 
{binary load). 

Carols will run in 16k although there will be some interference with the 
screen as the program loads. 



1 REM KHKMmHmXHjtmmXHHIK 

2 REM * CAROLS I 

3 REM X by S 

4 REM I A.J.COSTICK * 

5 HEM S * 

6 REM K PAGE 6 MAGAZINE - ENGLAND I 

? rem mmmmrammommo 

19 REM 

29 TRAP 29:? "MAKE CASSETTE (8), OR DISK 

<1)*;:INPUT DSfMF DSK)1 THEN 26 

38 TRAP 43808 ;DATA 0, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,3,9 

,9,8,6,9.8,0,9,19,11,12,13,14,15 

46 DIM DAT*(91>,HEX<22):FGR X=8 TO 22: 

READ rhrEX<X)=N:NEXT X:LINE=998:REST0R 

E 1888:TRAP 129:? 'CHECKING DATA' 

58 LIN£=LINEH8:? LINE:READ DAT*: IF LE 

N<0AT*K>99 THEN 228 

60 DATLIN=P£EK< 183) +PEEK( 184>*254: IF D 

ATLINOLINE THEN ? LINE;' MISSING' :END 

78 FOR X=l TO 8? STEP 2:D1=A3C<DAT*(X, 

X) ) -43 :D2=A$C< 0AT*tt+ 1 ,XH ) ) -48 : BYTE=H 

EX«DimaHEX(D2) 

38 IF PASS=2 THEN PUT *1,BYTE:NEXT X:R 

EW CHKSUNsGOTO 58 

99 TOTAL=TOTALtSYTE:IF TOTAL)??? THEN 

TOTAL=TaTAL 7 I000 

199 NEXT X:READ CHKSUH:IF TGTAL=CHKStH 

THEN 58 
119 GOTO 229 

128 IF PEEK* 195) 06 THEN 229 
138 IF PASS=8 THEN 178 
148 IF NOT D5K THEN 168 
158 PUT #1,224:PUT ll,2:PUT il,225;PUT 

#1,2:PUT #1,23:PUT #1,4?:CLQSE *l:END 

169 FOR X=l TO 2:PUT m,8:NEXT X:CL0SE 
IhEND 

179 IF NOT DSK THEN 298 
188 ? ■ INSERT DISK WITH DQS,PRESS RETU 
WjfDIM LN$<lh INPUT IN*:0PEN * 1,8,0, 
■D:CWRX" 



198 GOTO 218 

288 ? 'READY CASSETTE AND PRESS RETURN 
•;:0PEN ll^.tiS^C^RESTORE 239: FOR 
X-1 TO 42:REA0 N:PUT *1,N:NEXT X 
218 ? :? 'WRITING FILE , iPASS=2:LINE=9? 
8: RESTORE 1698;TRAP 128:6010 58 
228 ? "BAD DATA: LINE 'jLINEiEND 
238 DATA 9,38,283,47,34.4?, 16?, 68, 141, 
2,211,16?, 1,133,?, 1*9,34,133,18,169,4? 
,133, 11, 1*9,8, 141, 231,2,133,14,141, 47 
246 DATA 2,169,64,141,232,2,133,15,24, 
96 

1868 DATA FFFF8938S13E988eeee889998«88 
55555555555555558848585455555555888888 
080555555598888555555555 , 986 
1819 DATA 55888000AA2A9A02880998AAAAA3 
A8900009ftWW2A6A820680WrtWiA2320888 
f¥ttWftWrttt3?9AAA¥tftt. 357 
1928 DATA AA2A9A8288AAAAAAA3A939a0000e 
AAM2A0A9?8080Gee8A¥tiA8899989988eAA80 
986888898999888899888809 , 365 
1839 DATA 8998988888595888808999985858 
AA88 §80989 999888^9888 0999 988880A9 2A2A 
808998888999383888888898,153 
1948 DATA 800802000888fl0099999^8EBEAA 
9888809898000890to8EeEAAAAB£BEAAAABEBE 
^7978477435479824427435,841 
1958 DATA C78024879745F6338585858541D8 
3878797978477435787842982*828282029282 
02929282929292824 1EA3948, 249 
1868 DATA A9388D9AD48D99D4A9D28D18D96S 
48A922858CA933858D4C74E4D88D9A33A9838D 
32828D 1DD9A9208D97D4A92 1 , 322 
1879 DATA 3D6F02A93E8D2F82A8D&A232A907 
285CE4A9873O8002A93J8D8 192A9C88D8ED4A? 
888D98D8BD9 1D88D97333D93,887 
19B8 DATA DW9D09D29D04D2E3E884D8F5AA 
9D80249DeB25?D98269Dee27EBOeF1BDBE349D 
5324BDDE349D6025E8E929D8,788 
1998 DATA EFA9008DC3928DC7823DCJ92A9D6 
B0C582A?1A8CC482A9 1F80C992A9368DC 182A9 
8 13092333D9333D8AD973308. 13? 



by A,J.Costick 



1188 DATA 2DA?EAflD3ee2A9388D3192293F3E 

A9FF8DFC82ADFC82C9FFF8F9A299DD8337F819 

E3E88DD8 F6A9FD29 A4F64CCA , 386 

1118 DATA 3lEE?333AE9833E88DD982A28e8E 

933 3A988 8D8F338D3E 338D3C 33BDE9333DSD 33 

8A8AAAeD9B3385E0BD?C33fl5 ,782 

1128 DATA E1BDB53385E2BDB63335E3BDCF33 

8OD?39flDD0338DDA39A?D88O3892A?388O3 182 

A?8l8D8B33A?7E3O98068D8 1,461 

1138 DATA D0AD8AD2C938B8F98D2892AD8B33 
F92CAO2882D0F4AD0AO28D 12098D 13D930 \m 
AD9633C97ED88D8D8 ID9A97D.284 

1149 DATA 8D09D9SD9633D9CC8D81D9A?7EDe 
F18DG9D83D81D8A9FF3D2982AD1FD8C904F98D 
M2882D8F4A90 18D97334CB7 ,32 
1158 DATA 31A908F0F6A?8iAElFD9E885D003 
4D93333D9333198AE083D86E4D92333D9233A9 
FF3D8B333DF C62AEFC8 2E @ 2 1 ,359 
1168 DATA D918EE9433AD9433C9A6D0E7A9A8 
3D9433O9E9AD8B33F057 196ECE8B33AC9E33EE 
8E33CCSC33893ABEFA36CC98 ,869 
1178 DATA 339883AE9433AD9I33D983AE9533 
3E8 1D28AC9AeF8BAAC9333D894A2A8Dee 1CA3E 
8 3D2BE85D2AC9233D9 9 2A ?A8 , 422 

1139 DATA 8D87D24Ci2E4D9BlA9883D3E33AC 
8F33CC303398 17A9903D3B338D9 1D28D83D28D 
95C28D07D28D8F334C42E4EE ( S94 

1198 DATA 8F33B1E2S08C33B1E98D88D28W1 
3318698 13D06O2AD9133A299ODFE34F893E3D8 
F38026353D8202BD4035 186? ,469 
1288 DATA J8D84O2AD1FD9C986D8A1F8AE00 
0098998888808 19 1A2A889889999981D377D37 
E9377 139AB382B3W396B3A , 982 
1219 DATA FD3AA73BEB3BD53C51304D37B337 
2D399E38E3386239923AB43A323BA93B693C i 3 
3DC33D8826282659267B26A8 , ?5? 

1229 DATA 26C826F926i82748276827?627B8 
27E827383644tD4e376?493542753E77e88888 
800999999999]81?13988888,477 

1230 DATA 0880609092938499900930489013 
19139908890800009988000098998080008088 
171?1?1919I9889099999881,793 

1240 DATA 010 199990000 1?I9191?1?178800 
00008988800000900090880090099800 1? 19 19 
1?19 188888888 19 19 18008 13,34 
1258 DATA l9191fl?19MM8M8MNU9M8 
00999998888800099880000998J71V19199880 
808 19 18 18080 191? 19178880, 353 
1268 DATA 8089998008899899868969998888 
88600090056607839?9A8G0C0D0E99ai0161i8 
6E85868768899A8B9C0D0999 ,55 1 

continued overleaf 



12 



CAROLS continued 



PAGE 6- Issue 13 



1 



1278 data mmmmmmmmz'3iX7£ 

7E444W443CX3C3C3C347666664 20X383818 

19189880 10 191C3C3C7E7E7E, 582 

123* DATA 7E7E7E7CXX3C 19 108098666889 

2A2D2F32353?X4644484C5i l 3i4 
1299 DATA 555B68644C727?30a39699A2ADB4 
C1CCD9E4F32F3539C1D9B4ADE6C19B39F38888 
9K 1D9B6ADE6C 19*3af3BB8B ,444 
I3we DATA ??ClD?B.iADEdCIM88F38aBWMI 
6C72A2A23aD999F3D?33A288A2E6A2A288D999 
F3D983A238A2E4A2A288D???, 187 
1314 DATA F3D988A239A2£4888e636a?26973 
746D4 17389434 1724F4C730809216E6833292C 
252E34002E?9272334FF220E,858 
1328 DATA 99272F2F24002B292E279837252E 
2325332C2133FF239E98272F24903225333480 
392586202532323998 2 7252E . 648 
1338 DATA 342C2520252EFF248 E88 37 29292C 
25e83328253fi2325322433883?21342328FF25 
8E08 2FB8232F2D25ee2 12C2C ,474 
1348 DATA 86392598242 129342924352CFF26 
eE892F2E2325082?2E8B322F3?2 12C80242 134 
29248733B923293439FF270E , 648 
1358 DATA B92A292E272C258622252CX33FF 
239E9e34282599242?323334092£2F37252C2C 
FF298E962 1372 13988292E88 ,425 
1369 DATA 21902D212E272532FF2A9E062321 
322F2CB02F2600342825882432352DFF2B8E09 
332 12E342 189232021353308 ,569 
1378 DATA 293388232F2D292E9766342F9934 
2F372EFF2C8E9934232598232F2C2C3998212E 
248834232588 2?3i39fF2D8E , 565 
1388 DATA e826322F33343?8034282588332E 
2F372D212EFF00902F76740E0C33654C0E0607 
33786 1*3^5876 16C74657208 , 158 
1398 DATA 734F756E64FF88 8 733746 172748 7 
744F0872657475726E08746F0874484973996C 
497374FFA9A8A8A7A7A4A5A3 , 72 
1468 DATA A23F15123A2A383D398D8 1859825 
23836ft2F283E2D8Bl82E142B 1751485 1685 143 
5 1683535493C3C5 143463C48 , 373 
14 IS DATA 4351485169484830484351485148 
35352D35483C2f3C5169515B4C797?68248C18 
4B249C 184839 184838 184338 ,283 
1428 DATA 13248C 13249C 134839 13248C 1824 
8C 184938 18249C I84848249C I8248C 13433838 
515151485151404040485551,382 
1438 DATA 515151514851514C404C48555151 
3530484348485 1484048555 15 14C4C68555 151 
43353048495 13C5 1888C8C8C , 746 
1448 [ATA 8COC]8eC8C8C9C1818BC8C8C8C 
8C8Cl88CBC8CeC18139C8C&CeC9C8Clfi8C8C8C 
60 1818608000808000138080,48* 
1458 DATA 80901818363940484848435 15548 
4049555 1484868464048485 155604C48555 143 



49483C4340X352F46485148 ,427 
1448 DATA 555 1485 14 S483C4 849485 1554851 
5548485l484e3C352F48485l5568989C0C8C8C 
0C8C0C9CBC8C8C0C8C246C0C , 92? 
1478 DATA 8C8C8CeC8C8C6C8C8C9C8C248C8C 
8C8C8C8C8C8C8C8CeC8C8C248C9C388CeC0C8C 
9C8C 18969680 189C9C0C9C0C, 541 
1488 DATA aC8C8C0C9C24385B48485l5B4444 
4a5 1483C3C483C48353C44485 15B494B5 15B5B 
485888 18 138918 18 18 1918 18 ,956 
1498 DATA ]0iei8103816130810!0l0iei810 
19ieiei83fl3951516C514&4C4848483C484B51 
515548555 1 48485548 4C6C35 ,394 
1588 DATA 353C483C494848514e55484C5151 
555 1 485 1 4C484948463C484848 3048 4 35 1555 1 
X49485 15 188 142814142828,367 
1518 DATA 1414141428141428141414141414 
231E8A488A1E14 14282314 14 14 14 1E8A1414 14 
141414281414141414142314,451 
1529 DATA 1414I41414281414231E8A58384C 
555 15151555 143485 15 148 354848485 1555 14C 
555151515551484851514835,334 
1538 DATA 4040485 1555 12F2F35513C3C482F 
2F354848485 1555 189 18 18249C8C9C8C8C 1318 
18 13240C9C0C8C8C30 1B1S24 , 257 
1548 DATA 8C9C6C8C8C 18 13 1813246080909: 
8C381818248C18183ei818248C8C8C«C8C3B3e 
51512F353C515151512F353C775 
1558 DATA 4843482D2F35482823282D352F5 1 
5 12F353C5 15 15 15 12F353C4848482D2F352828 
'232323282D353C2S2F2F2F2F ,248 
1568 DATA 2F2F2F283C352F2D2D2D202D2F2F 
2F2F2F35352F35282F2F2F2F2F2F2F28X352F 
2D20202D2D2F2F2F2F28282D ,382 
1578 DATA 35X99eA8A0A9A6AJE85858C0t«C 
8C 1E8A0A0 A8A8A ! E0A0A9A8A0A 1E9A9A8A0A8A 
1 E95858A8A8A8A 1 E6A0A8A0A , 23 
1588 DATA 8A8A8A8A8A8A8A8A8A14148ABA14 
8A8A ]48A8ABF8528eA8A8A8A8AeA8A85858A8A 
9A8A 14 148A8A148A8A 148A8A , 573 
1598 DATA 0F85288A0A8ABA8A8AeA95959A0A 
8AeA283fl486C794C685B5l43483C48485 14348 
3C48485143483C515B48684C,34 
1488 DATA 794C485B5148403C4848514848X 
40485 143493C515B68696C794C4058513C4048 
485130404351484830515848,614 
1618 DATA 8888981393838828888319181828 
988818 18 18 199810 18 18 16208383 1888*88828 
938310101928880810181918,278 
1628 DATA IB 191818 18288883138388882883 
83281030181810101616181818263879565851 
435B5B48443C3C35445 14344 ,54 
1638 DATA 443C48435B48514C5B69775B5B51 
485B5B43443C3C35445I4844443C48485B4851 
6C685B8829282eie 18282810, 124 
1448 DATA 1028292848101929282028281818 



26202848282828 18 18282810182828294818 18 

2828282829 18 182828284038 , 598 

1658 DATA 585 1484848444844485B5B5 14948 

4848444344485 1 4344 3C3C3C353C 44485 15 143 

443C3C3C3532353C44353C44 ,468 

1448 DATA 433C44435! 585 143484848444844 

43515B5 15B580838 1628 18 199388 1678 19 18 16 

181818198393185819191018,683 

1479 DATA 1918180888187819161818191816 

9888182988831820039816783819191816)083 

081968886819 193939292F2D,376 

1688 DATA 23282823 IF IE 1E2F2D232S282328 

2D2D2F28302F352D49X282F2D28292823 1 F IE 

1E2F2D28282823232D2D2F28,757 

1698 DATA 3C2F3520483C1E1A1E1F1E23231E 

1A1E1F1E231A171A1C1A1F1F1F1F1E1A1E1F23 

2323232F2D282328231F IE IE, 348 

1788 DATA 2F2D282S2823232D2D2F2SX2F35 

2D 1A1E1E1A171A IE 1788 19986818 18B39898 18 

288883191918986819201618,535 

1719 DATA 1919182618781989881913888883 

1626680310 19 188883192916 18 18 181628 1879 

18 19 19 18 18 1828 10 18 16 18 10, 463 

1729 DATA 3919101019101618189393161810 
1628 13986988 19 13938388 18299399 18 18 1988 
831826181818101826101083,191 

1730 DATA 8863031820365J51515I2F354851 
5151512F35353C484851404968464C5143483C 
40485 1515 1515 12F3549515 J, 125 

1748 DATA 5151512F3535X484851486B684C 
514948X49435 12888 149A9A 14 14 14 1E9A8A8A 
14 142B8A8A9A8A 148ABA9ABA ,36 
1758 DATA 140A9A8A9A141423149A8A1414L4 
1 48A9A9A9A14 14289A8A8A8A 1 4 146A8A 149A8A 
8A9A1414141E3851405B5 130,123 
1748 DATA 40X353049485148X3530404848 
5 13C465 1485158485B5 151695B5 13049X3530 
49485 1483C353C484848513C, 38 1 
1779 DATA 685148515B4&4C797948483C3C46 
435 1 685B485 15BA8684C4C5 15 1464835354835 
3:4843515151485851304630,892 
1788 DATA 353C404S5 140X35X46484351 3C 
485 1435158604C793C8028 1808 10288868 18 10 
16 1839989316 18 1883861818,966 
1798 DATA 1068831818191848201388162003 
0818 18 18 3838886819 !8 19889818 16 16889310 
1818 1638 1916161816 IB 1016,758 
1868 DATA 1818101819381818191818181819 
93931010 10 1928282918031020880810 18 1816 
38938818)810038618181989,524 
1818 DATA 0319S91810282038A98885E8A935 
85E1A92485E3A90818498435E2A288ABB881E6 
C9FFF06591E2C3D8F5A5E2 18,43 
1828 DATA 6?2885E2A5E3498885E318C89865 
E085E8A5E 1698835E lE8E00FD0D446eee08898 
890888698880986660690998,362 □ 






PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



13 



Demo 



.i«a^ 



The Moving Triangle! 



Q PEN tttt HHMMMUMMXMWMW W MMKMMMMKKMMXWK 

1 REM **« BY LUKE HDLLIHCBERY «** 

2 REN *** CAGE 14) *** 

3 BEH MMMMltmtltmtMMMMKMMlOtmtHMHlCMMMMM 

10 GRAPHICS 11 
15 A=1:B=1 

29 c=i:Y=0:X=0 
25 COLOR C 

30 PLOT K*10,Y:DRAHTO H + 20 , Y + 3G : DKOWHS 
X,Y+30:DRAHT0 H+10,Y 

40 IF X=S9 THEN A=~l 

5i IF K-e THEN A=l 

60 IF ¥=161 THEN B=-l 

70 IF V=« THEM B=i 

80 X=X+A:Y=Y+B 

90 IF C<30 THEN C=C+1:GOTO 25 

100 0=1: GOTO 25 

9999 GOTO 9999 




...GTIA 



by Luke Hollingbery 



ATARI 400/800/XL 

SECONDHAND 
SOFTWARE 

AT 

DAFT 



PRICES 



Send s.a.e. to 

Mike Jervis, 19 Portree Drive, Rise Park, 

Nottingham or ring 0602 274369 



i iJ fftrfjrSjfj-fJSir/- '■."■/■ V 





1 

2 
3 



REM mCMXttXttMMMKMKMXMWMMMMMWMtt W MMMMM 
REM *** BY LUKE HOLLINGBERY *** 

HEM *»* CAGE 14J *** 

REM WW I tKKMMlCMMMKMMMilMKKKWWlOOtWICl l KM M 

10 GRAPHICS 9 

20 H=39:Y=95:C=l:A=I:B=i 

30 COLOR C 

40 PLOT 39,95-Y:DRAkTG X+39 , Y+95 :DRAHT 

39-X,Y+95;PRftHT0 39,95-Y 

50 PLOT 39,9S+¥:fiRAHT0 39-H, 95~Y :DRAHT 

X+39,95~Y:DRAWT0 39,95*Y 

500 Y=Y-B:X=X-ft:C-C+l 

510 IF G=14 THEN C=l 

520 IF X=^39 THEM A=-1:X=-3B 

530 IF X=39 THEM A=liX=38 

i40 IF Y=-95 THEN B=-l!Y=-94 

!50 IF Y=95 THEH B=ltY=94 
700 GOTO 30 



ZOOMSOFT 



GMK. dl*h 

H{ > HI IKSOS OF CLAV MORGUE CASTLE 9.95 17.95 

JETBOOTJACK 7.95 N/A 

ZEPPELIN 995 12.95 

NECROMANCER **95 12.95 

PHAROAHS CURSE 9.95 12.95 

UAIM JUMPER 9.95 12.95 

MIAMUSII 9.95 12 95 

SURVIVOR 9.95 12.95 

DHL LBS 9.95 12.95 

SLIME 9.95 12.95 

I UKT APOCALYPSE 9.95 12.95 

ENCOUNTER K.S5 11.00 

COMBAT LEADED 14.95 14 95 

CUTTHROATS N/A 30.20 

HITCH HIKhHS GUIDE TO THE GALAXY N/A 30.20 

DAKKtHVSTAl. N/A 26.95 

SEASTALKER N/A 2H.75 

SORCEROR N/A 35.95 

MASTER TVPE N/A 33 20 

MASTKHTVVb. ROM 34.45 

NET WORTH N/A 65.25 

BCS QUEST FOR TYRES N/A 24.50 

OILS WELL N/A 19.95 

MKKC) VAINTI.K N/A 24.95 

TALE OF BETA LYRAE N/A 23.60 

MHHOhUt A Nil HIS ROBOT FACTORY N/A 21.95 

FLIGHT SI MULATOHII N/A 37. 95 

llANCINGFEATSlmuikch 21.30 25.60 

HAIL* WEST N/A 29.95 

SARGOM II I7.J0 17.30 

MASK OFTHE SUN N/A 33.50 

HI IIMA III KKimtJS N/A 45.30 

ADVENTURE CHEATOfl ROM 28.75 

NATO COM MAN DEH 935 13.95 

FORBIDDEN FOREST 8.95 N/A 

BUCK ROGERS ROM 28 75 

CASTLE WOl I hS-iTEM N/A 21.95 

DATA PEKJT-CT N/A 73.95 

STAR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2S.00 23.00 

Plus 100's more tides available, Send s.a.e. for PRE 
catalogue- Send cheques/P.O. to 

ZOOMSOFT, 46 Huntsworth Mews, Loildoi, 
NW1 6DB. TeL 01 723 0562 

Foreign orders please add £1 .25 for post 






14 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Competition Winner &^# Competition Winner *** Competition Winner 



FLIGHT of the SWAN 



Flight of the Swan is the other winner of our 
scrolling competition chosen because of its original 
theme. Like Rescue Mission, this game requires 
32 k 

THE GAME 

The game follows the flight of a migrating swan from a 
mud bank, over hills and through caverns avoiding 
telegraph poles and clouds etc. until final splashdown on 
a distant lake. 

The swan has three lives and to survive must eat four 
objects including a glucose tablet a kipper, a worm and a 
can of beans(!}. These objects are all coloured pink. Once 
all four, or a combination of any four, are eaten, the 
objects turn yellow and in this condition will increase the 
swan's metabolic rate to such anextentthathedies. Once 
the four objects have been eaten, the swan has sufficient 
energy to make it through the caverns, Throughout the 
game, avoid anything that is not pink until finally the lake 
is in view where you may safely land. 

The swan is controlled by the joystick moving up T 
down, diagonally or forwards, He cannot move 
backwards. There are two difficulty levels with level 2 
being very difficult. Once three lives are lost System 
Reset will re- run the game, 

The first game after loading will take about 15 seconds 
to initialise but after this the game will re- run 
immediately. 

Q REM MMKmOCKWMMMMMWMKKKItMMmtMHWWKlCWl t 

1 REM * FLIGHT OF THE SHAH * 

2 REM * by 

3 REM * Christopher Jephcott 

4 REM * 

5 REM * PAGE 6 MAGAZINE - ENGLAND 
ft REM M KMttMMMXMXttttXMWMttMMMMMHMXMKXa W tt 
7 REM 

8 GRAPHICS OPPOSITION 17,10:? "\*W3-XAM 

li^Ki. .,*■:? i? :? :? :? t? :? :? :? :? 

:? :? : ? :? :? :? :? :? :? 

10 FOR Z-I TO 63: FOR 1=0 TO 7: READ fi:P 

OKE 132*256+Z*8+I,A:HEHT I:MEXT Z 

20 POKE 15000,0 

30 POKE 764,1Z:CL0AD ;REM DISK USERS 

REPLACE WITH RUN DlSMAN.BftS 
100 DATA 1,3,7,15,31,63,127,255,128,19 
2,224, 240 ,240, 252 , 254 , 255 
110 DATA 12,70, 36,28, 12,00,35, 97,140,1 
08 , 84 , 124 , 28 , 14 , 27 , 49 , 48 , 50, 36 , 56 , 48 , 1 
12,200,140 

120 DATA 1,1,3,3,7,15,63,255,128,128,1 
92,152,224,248,252,255,8,96,246,110,22 



by Christopher Jephcott 



* 
* 

* 




TYPING IT IN 

The game should be typed and saved in two parts as 
shown Cassette users should CSAVE the first listing and 
then leave the tape in place in the cassette Next type in 
the second listing and CSAVE it immediately after the 
first Wind back the tape and CLOAD. When RUN is 
typed the first program will automatically load in the 
second. Type RUM and. away you go. 

Dis k us ers sho u I d first ly ch an ge 15 ne 3 of the first li sti ng 
to read RUN 4, D: SWANBAS" and save the program as 
11 D: SWAN' .Type in and SAVE the second listing with the 
filename "D: SWAN.BAS 11 and then type RUN "D 
SWAN". The game should load and play. 

1,187,46,4,0,64,236,242,165,127,57,16 
125 DATA 0,0,1,35,119,255,254,46,32,24 

0,248,254,255,127,62,6 

130 DATA 0,0,0,24,92,238,255,0,63,126, 

253,3,251,171,171,251,251,251,171,171, 

251,171,171,251 

140 DATA 0,0,85,255,255,255,255,255,0, 

0,0,1,3,3,3,1,0,0,0, 224 , 240 , 240 , 240 , 22 

4 

150 DATA 0,33,01,255,63,14,6,2,128,113 
,83,54, 159 , 234 , 119 , 30, , , 3 , 15 , 19,127, 
255 , 127 ,3,7, 249 , 241 , 254 , 254 , 254 ,254 
160 DATA 1,7,31,63,127,127,255,255,120 
, 224 , 248 , 252 , 254 , 254 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 2 
55, 255 , 255 , 255 , 255, 255 

170 DATA 124,124,76,04,76,04,76,124,2, 
13,31,6,2,98,182,20,0,0,0*56,125,222,1 
25,56,0,0,31,62, 124 , 1 , 127 , 126 
180 DATA 0,0,62,124,250,6,244,240,24,6 
0,247,52, 247 ,52,52,52, 255 , 126 ,60,24,0, 
0,0,0 

190 DATA 52,52,52,52,52,52,52,52,3,4,3 
1 , 255 ,14,1,0,0, 129 , 227 , 252 , 255 , 252 , 192 
,192,64 









PAGES ■ Issue 13 



15 



280 DATA 0,6,0,0,251,125,62,31,6,6,0,6 
,246,246,246,112 

218 DATA 126,96,118,255,63,62,34,162,4 
4 P 11« , 255 , 6 , 255 , 291 , 261 , 255 , 64,128 , 2X8 
,131,223,158,17,17 

228 DATA 125,219,173,247,221,187,183,2 
21,85, 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 
238 DATA 16,63,127,255,8,127,77,79,8,2 
52,254,255,8,254,254,254,16,16,16,56,5 
6,124,126,255 

248 DATA 157,149,283,255,255,219,153,1 
65,0,0,142,127,172,222,36,63,16,16,80, 
125,125,255,255,255 

258 DATA 16,16,26,52,189,253,255,255,6 
,6,0,24,66, 126 , 126,255 ,8,16,24,24,24,6 
8, 126, 255 , 24 , 24, 24 , 68 , 66, 126, 255 , 255 
268 DATA 129,129,195,231,231,255,255,2 
55,8,8,8,3,15,31, 127 , 255 , 1 r 99,243 , 255 , 
255,255,255,255 

276 DATA 255,126,68,24,8,0,6,8,255,124 
, 124 ,56,56,16, 16,8,255,126 , 56 , 12 , 24 , 11 
2,64,32 

288 DATA 255,254,252,248,248,224,192,1 
28,255, 127,63,31,15,7,3,1, 255 , 255 , 127 , 
127,63,31,7,1 

298 DATA 255,255,254,254,252,248,224,1 
28,255,252,248,224,192,192,128,128,255 
,63,15,7,3,3,1,1 

MAIN LISTING 

6 DIH PMS(204BJ !DIH PLAYERS 1621 : G = : P0 
KE 832, 6: DIM A$ C4J :LI~3 :UH=8 !D=8 

1 P MS til =Cttfl$ (8) : PMS (2848) = CHRS (03 : PMS 
t2J=PH$ 

2 DIM CLEARS (128) :CLEARS CD =CHR$(0) :CL 
EAR$(128)=CHRS(8) ; CLEARS (21 -CLEARS 

3 POKE 2,52: POKE 3, 185: POKE 9,2: TRAP 3 
8888 

50 GOSUB 8866 

1868 GRAPHICS 8 I POKE 559, 6:RT=PEEK (186 
):POKE 788,200:P0KE 789,28:P6KE 710,13 
9:H=90:POKE 711,60 

1848 T=RT-2Q:DM=256*T:f0R 1=1536 TO 15 
38 SPOKE I, 112: NEXT I: POKE 756,132 
1858 FOR 1=1539 T6 1572 STEP 3IP0KE I, 
87: POKE 1+1,8 i POKE 1+2, T : T=T+l: NEXT I 
1868 POKE 1575, 65 i POKE 1576,6: POKE 157 
7, 6; POKE 566,0: POKE 561,6 
1086 POKE 559,46: GOSUB 3088 
1861 IF M>6 THEN 2886 
1166 IF PEEK (15688)00 THEM 1249 
1182 RESTORE 1120 : 60T=DM+2816 : FOR H=8 
TO 255! READ Y, CHAR, F I, BO 
1105 0FSET=DM+256*Y+X:POKE OFSET,CHAR 
1116 FOR I=0F5ET+256 TO BOT+X STEP 256 
JPOKE I,FI:NEXT I:POKE BOT+X, 80 :HEMT X 



1111 RESTORE 1240:BOT=DH:FOR K=146 TO 
219:READ Y.CHAR 

1112 0FSET-D»+256*Y*X:P0KE OFSET,CHAR 

1113 FOR I=B0T+X~256 TO OFSET+X-256 ST 
EP 256! POKE 1 ,88: NEXT I: NEXT X 

1114 RESTORE 1245 : BOT DM+2816 : FOR 2=1 
TO 16 X READ X, Y , CHAR : SOUND 0,7*10,10,10 

1115 0FSET=DM+256*Y+X SPOKE 0F5ET,CHAR: 
NEXT Z:SOURD 8,8,8,8 

1117 POKE 15686,1 

1128 DATA 5,15,184,184,5,15,184,164,5, 
15,164,164,5,15,104,104 

1125 DATA 5,15,184,164,5,15,184,164,5, 
15 , 184 , 184,5 , 15,184 ,184,5,17,8,41 
1138 DATA 10,8,8,41,18,8,0,41,18,229,0 
,41,10,6,0,41,10,6,0,24,9,102,24,24 
1135 DATA 9,8,41,24,16,23,24,24,10,6,0 
,41,2,94,96,41,9,1,24,24,8,6,24,24,7,2 
2,24,24 

1148 DATA 6,1,24,24,6,41,24,24,6,41,24 
,24,5,1,24,24,4, 218 ,24,24,5,41,24,24,5 
,2,24,24,6,2,24,24,7,2,24,24 
1145 DATA 8,23,24,24,9,15,184,184,9,15 
,104,104,9,15, 184 , 184 , 10 , 169,152,152 , 1 
0,169,152,152,9,99,169,152 
1158 DATA 9,188,169,152,18,169,152,152 
,9,15, 184 ,104,9,15, 164 , 184 ,9,7,24,24,1 
8,2,24,24,2,94,96,41 

1155 DATA 9,6,24,24,8,1,24,24,7,22,24, 
24,6,6,24,24,6,7,24,24,7,2,24,24,6,6,2 
4,24,5,1,24,24,3,67,24,24,2,22,24,24 
1168 DATA 2,41,24,24,2,23,24,24,3,7,24 
,24,4,2,24,24,5,7,24,24,5,6,24,24,4,1, 
24,24,3,217,24,24,4,2,24,24 
1165 DATA 5,2,24,24,6,2,24,24,7,7,24,2 
4 , 8 , 41 , 24, 24 , 7 , 182 , 24 , 24 , 8 , 41 , 24 , 24 , 9 , 
133,24,24,18,7,24,24,5,94,96,41 
1178 DATA 10,0,24,41,10,163,8,41,9,22, 
24,24,8,6,24,24,7,131,24,24,0,2,24,24, 
9,7,24,24 

1175 DATA 16,41,24,24,18,106,24,24,18, 
10 7 , 24, 24 , 11 , 41 , 24 , 41 , 10 , 1 , 24 , 24, 9 , 22 , 
24,24,8, 221 ,24,24,9,2,24,24,10,2,24,24 
1188 DATA 10,6,24,24,9,1,24,24,8,22,24 
,24,7,6,24,24,7,7,24,24,8,41,24,24,0,0 
,8,41,8,8,0,41,6,16,8,41,6,15,8,41 
1185 DATA 6,15,0,41,6,15,8,41,6,15,0,4 
1,6,15,0,41,6,15,8,41,6,15,8,41,6,15,6 
, 41 , 6 , 15, 8 , 41 , 6 , 17 , 6, 41 , 7 , 16 , , 41 
1198 DATA 7,15,8,41,7,16,8,41,7,17,8,4 
1,0,8,0,41,0,0,0,41,0,8,0,24,8,22,24,2 
4,7,6,24,24,7,41,24,24 

1191 DATA 7,41,24,24,7,41,24,24,6,68,2 
4,24,7,41,24,24 

1195 DATA 6,1,24,24,5,6,24,24,5,41,24, 
24,4,219,24,24 

continued overleaf 



16 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



FLIGHT of the SWAN continued 

1208 DATA 5,7,24,24,5,68,24,24,7,7,24, 

24, 8, 23, 24, 24, 9, 15, 104, 184, 9, 15, 184, IB 

4,18, 163 , 152 , 152 ,18,16? , 152 , 152 

1285 DATA 18,163,152,152,18,169,152,15 

2,9,15,184,184.9,15,184,184,9,15,18411 

84,9,15,184,184 

1218 DATA 8,78,184,184,7,65,184,184,6, 
86 , 88 , 88 , 5 , 65, 3ft , 68 , 4 , 70 , 8ft , 38 , 3, 188 , 8 
« , 88 , 4 , 71 , 88, 88 , 5 , 87 , 88, 88 , 6 , 66 , 83 , 88 
1215 DATA 7,71,88,88,8,66,88,88,9,71,8 
8 , 88 , 10 , 88 , 88 , 88 , 9 , 70 , 88 , 38 , ft , 65 , 88 , 88 
, 7 , 86, 88 , 88 , 7 , 88, 88 , 88 , 7 P 87 , 88, 88 
1217 DATA 8,66,88,88,3,116,88,88,8,76, 
88 , 38, 7 , 65 , 88 , 88, 6 , 65, 33 , 83 , 5 , 113 ,88,8 
8,5,70,38,88,4,65,88,88,3,78,88,88 

1219 DATA 2,115,88,88,3,66,88,88,4,71, 
88 , 83 , 5 , 37 , 8ft , 88 , 6 , 71 , 8» , 88 , 6 , 1 17 , 88 , 8 
8,6, 118 ,88,88,6, 116 , 88 , 88, 5 , 65 , 88 , 88 
1221 DATA 4,65,88,88,3,70,80,88,2,113, 
88 , 88 , 3 , 66 , 88 , 38 , 4 , 66 , 88 , 8ft , 5 , 87, 88 , 08 
,6,66,68,88,7,71,88,88,8,87,88,88 
1223 DATA 9,66,88,88,18,87,88,88,18,11 
7,88,88,16, 118 , 88 , 88, 9 , 78, 33 , 88 , 8, 65 , 8 
8,88,7,70,88,88,6, 113 ,88,38,7,71,88,8ft 
1225 DATA ft , 66 , 88,38, 8 , 76,88,3ft, 7,65, 8 
8, 88, 6, 65, 88, 88, 5, 111, 88, 88, 6, 116 ,88,8 
8,6, 105 , 83 , 88 , 5 , 65 , 83 , 88 , 4 , 70 , 88 , 88 

1227 DATA 3,65,08,33,2,113,88,88,3,71, 
88 r 88 , 4, 87 , 88 , 88 , 5 , 66 , 88 , 38 , 5 , 117 ,88,8 
8, 5, 118, 88, 38, 5 ,87,88,88,6,71,8ft, 88 

1228 DATA 7,87,88,88,8,68,88,88,9,71,8 
8 , 88 , 10, 116 , 88 , 88 , 9, 78 , 88 , 88, 8 , 86 , 88, ft 
8,7,65,80,88,6,65,88,88,6 ,87 ,86,88 

1229 DATA 7,15,184,104,7,15,104,104,7, 
15,184,104,7,15,104,184,7,15,104,184,7 

,15,184,104 

1230 DATA 9,143,152,152,9,143,152,152, 
9, 143 , 152 , 152 , 9 , 143 , 1 52 , 152 , 9 , 143 , 152 , 

152 

1231 DATA 9,143,152,152,9,143,152,152, 
9,143, 152 , 152 , 9 , 143 , 152 , 152 , 9 , 143 , 152 , 
152 

1232 DATA 9,143,152,152,9,143,152,152, 
9 , 143 , 152 , 152 , 9 , 143 , 162 , 152 ,9,143, 152 , 

152 

1233 DATA 9,143,152,152,9,143,152,152, 
9,143,152,152,9,143,152,152,9,143,152, 

152 

1234 DATA 9,143,152,152,9,143,152,152, 

9 r 143 , 152 , 152 , 9 , 143 , 152 , 152 , ? , 143 , 152 , 

152 

1235 DATA 9,143,152,152,9,143,152,152, 
9,143,152, 152 ,9,143, 152 , 152 , 9 , 143 , 152 , 

152 

1236 DATA 8,143,152,152,8,143,152,152, 
8,143,152,152,8,143,152,152,8,143,152, 

152 

1237 DATA 8,143,152,152,8,143,152,152, 
8,143, 152 , 152 , 8 , 143 , 152 , 152 , 8 , 143,152 , 



152 

1238 DATA 0,143,152,152,8,143,152,152, 
8,143,152,152,8,143,152,152,8,143,152, 

152 

1239 DATA 8,143,152,152,8,143,152,152, 
8,143,152,152,8,143,152,152,8,143,152, 

152 

1240 DATA 0,124,1,123,2,127,3,124,4,12 
7,5,113,4,126,3,122,3,127,4,123,5,121, 
4 , 122 , 3 , 126 , 2 , 125 , 2 , 127,3,120,2, 126 

1241 DATA 1,125,1,127,1,122,0,126,8,11 
9,0,119,0,127,1,123,2,124,3,119,2,125, 
1,126,1,124,1,125,0,126,0,120,0,123 

1242 DATA 1,127,2,123,3,127,3,125,3,12 
3 ,4,123 ,5,127 , 6 , 119,5 , 126 , 4 , 125 , 3 , 122 , 
2,126,1,126,1,127,1,95,1,95,1,121,1,95 

1243 DATA i, ±26, 6, 126 ,0,124, 1, 120, 8,12 
5,8,95,0,95,0,123,1,127,2,124,2,126,2, 
127,3,127,4,119,3,125,2,122,2,127 

1244 DATA 3,124,3,125,2,126,1,122,0,12 

5 

1245 DATA 12,1,137,13,1,136,24,2,82,29 

,3,138,30,3, 139 ,47,3,140,48,3,149, 180, 
8, 82 , 101 , 1 , 82 , 102 , 2 , 82 , 103 ,3,82 

1246 DATA 104,4,82,185,5,82,60,1,137,6 
1,1, 138, 200, 3,, 237 

1249 RESTORE 1260:5D=1 

1258 FOR 1=1578 TO 1637 t READ A! POKE I, 

A:NEKT I:F-Ul»Rti578> 

1260 DATA 104,169,0,133,283,141,4,212, 

160,59,162,6,169,7,76,92 

1270 DATA 228,198,203,165,203,141,4,21 

2,16,31,163,7,133,203 

1280 DATA 141,4,212,238,4,6,173,4,6,20 

1,234,208,2,169,8,162 

1290 DATA 8,157,4,6,232,232,232,224,39 

,200,246,76,98,228 

1399 Y-45JH=88:EP=0 

2000 5=3TICK161 :CD=PEEKC532523 :UH=UM*I 

2010 IF S-? THEN H=X*5P:HI=Xi+SP;X2=H2 

+5P 5 IMAGE = 1 i GOSUB 4008 : IHA£E=1 5 : GO SUB 

4100:IMAGE=29:G05UB 4200 

2036 IF 5=14 THEM Y=Y-SP:GQ51IB 4000 

2048 IF 5=13 THEN Y=Y+5P:G05UB 4000 

2060 IF S=5 THEM Y=Y+SP: H=X+5P :X1=H1+S 

P : X2=X2+5P : INA6E=1 I G0SUB 4000 : IMAGE=15 

;G05UB 4ieO:IHAGE=29:G05UD 4200 
2065 IF Y<15 THEN Y=Y+SP.GftSUB 4000 
2070 IF 5-6 THEM Y=Y-5P3 H=X+5P :XI=Hl+5 
P ; X2=X2+5P : 1MAGE=1 : GD5UB 4008 : IMAGE =15 

:G05U8 4100:IMAGE=29;GO5UB 4200 

2090 POKE 53248, X:POKE 53249 , XI SPOKE 5 
3250, X2 

2091 IF Y>80 AMD CD=2 OR Y>88 AND CD=4 
THEN GOTO 7000 

2095 IF CDOO THEM GOSUB 5000 

2096 POKE 53278,0 

2999 GOTO 2000 

3000 IF D=l THEM FOR Z=8 TO 4O0:HEXT Z 






PAGE 6 - issue 13 



17 



:POKE 53278, B 

3014 RE5T0RE 3638! FOR L=l TO 62 ; READ ft 

3028 PLAYER$CL,L)=€HR$(A) :NEHT L 

3038 DATA 8,8,8,8,0,8,8,8,7,230,24,0,0 

,8,0,0,8,8,0,8,24,52,244,248,24,8,0,0, 

B|QjpB|V|Qf 

3048 DATA 24,60,127,199,126,60,16,12,0 
,0,0, 0,8,0, 24, 60, 103, 217, 60, 120, 244, 8, 
0,0,8,0,0,8 
3058 A=flDR(Ptt$) 
3060 PB-IMT<0/1024>*1024 
3876 IF PB<fi THEN PB=PB+102* 
3086 5-PB-A 

3850 POKE 54279, PB/256 

3168 P0=S+512 : PI=S+640 : P2=S+768 : P3=S*8 
96 

3110 FOR 7=0 TO 3:P0KE 53256+Z, 8 :MEXT 
Z 

3130 POKE 704, 55: POKE 785, 15 J POKE 706, 
36! POKE 707,38 

3140 POKE 559,46:PQKE 53277, 3:P0KE 623 
,33 

3150 X=88:K1=80;X2=0O;X3=100:POKE 5324 
8, X I POKE 53249, Ml SPOKE 53250, X2 
3160 Y=45:IHAGE=1 

3170 PHS CP0+V , P0+ Y+19) =PL AVERS CIHAGE , I 
MAGE +19) 

31B0 Y=45ilHAGE=15 

3190 PHSCP1+Y,PI+Y+19)=PLAYERS CIHAGE, I 
HAGE+191 

3200 Y=45!IMAGE=29 

3210 PH$ CP2+Y , P2+Y+I9) =PLAYER$ CIHAGE , I 
HAGE+19) 
3230 RETURN 

4O0O IHAGE=I:PH$CPO*Y,P0+¥+195=PLAYER$ 
(IMAGE, IHAGE+19) :IMAGE-15 
4100 PHS CP1+Y, P1+Y+19J =PLAYERS CIHAGE, I 
HAGE+19) :IHA€E=29 

4200 PHSCP2+Y,P2+Y+19)=PLAVER$tIHAGE,I 
HAGE+19) : RETURN 
5000 IF SP>3 THEN 5015 

5010 IF CD=8 THEM EP=EP+1 :G0SUB 5200 :R 
ETURH 

5015 D=l:FOR Z=8 TO ? : X2=X2+i : SOUND 8, 
X,4,10 

5816 PH$(PZ+Y,P2+Y+19)=PLftYER$ CIHAGE, I 
HAGE+19) SPOKE 53250**2; NEXT Z:F0R Z=i 
TO IS :V = Y + 4: SOUND 0,Y,10,1O 

5017 GOSUB 4000; NEXT Z :PKS CD =CHRS CO) ; 
PMS C2048J =CHR$ CO) : PMS (2) =PHS : SOUND , 
,0,8 

5018 CLEAR$«1)=CHR$C0) : CLEARS (1ZSJ =CHR 
$C8) I CLEARS (2)=CLEAR$ 

5019 LI=LI-1:IF LI=0 THEN GOSUB 9000 

5020 GOTO 1040 

5200 IF EP=4 THE* SP=4:P0KE 711,238 

5201 IF H=l THEN 5P=3.5 

5205 FOR Z=6B TO 50 STEP -1: SOUND 8,Z, 
10,1O:HEHT Z 



5200 FOR Z=150 TO 160: SOUND O,Z,1O,10: 
HEHT Z: SOUND 0,0,0,0 
5210 RETURN 

7000 GRAPHICS 16: FOR Z=0 TO 2: POKE 532 
4&+Z,20:NEXT Z:POKE 710,145: POKE 752,1 
7020 POSITION 14,2:? "THE FLIGHT OF" : P 
05ITI0N 10,3:1 "THE SHAN" 
7030 POSITION 13,8:? ' i*ii:wiMiiiggmoni:i^ " 
: POSITION 15,11:? "SPLASH0OHN" :P0SITI0 
N 15,13t? "SUCCESSFULL" 
7040 POSITION 16,17:? " HJ!!-mm3a M 
7045 POSITION 12,221? "UNIT5=";UN 

7050 POSITION 25,23:? " laawaaiBT 1 

7200 RESTORE 7580; POKE 709,15 
7218 FOR Z=0 TO 16:READ N 
7228 FOR T=15 TO O STEP ^1 

7225 SOUND , N, 10 , T : POKE 710, N 

7226 NEXT T 
7238 NEXT Z 

7240 FOR T=15 TO O STEP -1 
7250 SOUND 0,60,18, T: SOUND 1,121,10,T: 
SOUND 2,91,10,T:S0UND 0, 81 , 10, T :POKE 7 
19, T 

7260 NEXT T 
7270 GOTO 7270 

7500 DATA 121,91,72,60,55,60,55,60,121 
,108,121 

7518 DATA 100,91,60,121,243,60 
8008 GRAPHICS 17 

8810 POKE 700,15 ;POKE 709, 200: POKE 710 
,60: POKE 711,220: POKE 712,135 
8020 POSITION 4,2:? tt6;"THE FLIGHT OF" 
:POSITION 6,3:? «6;"THE SHAN" 
0030 POSITION 9,8:? B6 ; "by'^POSITION 
,10:? iftfi : " WHrlfclM JU JrlU J!I4AA< " 
9005 POSITION 3,13:? tt6 ; "EHED fH3Hfl" 
8866 POSITION 3,14:? tt6;"fB33] raETJS" 
8870 IF PEEK (764) =30 THEN 5P=1,8 :H=1 Til 
ETURM 

8080 IF PEEK (7643 =31 THEN 5P=3: RETURN 
8899 GOTO 8070 

9000 FOR Z=0 TO 2JP0KE 53248+Z , : NEXT 
Z 

9010 GRAPHICS 17:P0SITI0H 5,5:? B6 ; "g<J 
Me aver": POSITION 5,8:? tt6 ; "ftiMSB" : P 
OSITION 5, 11!? HO; "UNITS-"; UN 
9015 POSITION 5,19:? 116: " < BgHJIJXfAJ > 



9020 GOTO 9020 
30000 RUN 



□ 



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DON'T RELAX DO IT! 



18 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Special Interest 



Adventure 

5. SANDS OF EGYPT 

Sands of Egypt was reviewed by Alexander Kells in 
Issue 10, so [wont say too much about it here. I'll assume 
that you ve read the review or you re already familiar with 
the game. 

However, 1 can't help commenting on the impressive 
graphics. Sands of Egypt has a very attractive split screen 
display on a narrow play field, The top half shows a 
colourful, high resolution picture in ANTIC mode 14, 
while the bottom is devoted to text Player- missile graphics 
fill the yaps at each side of the display (in the form of 
Egyptian hieroglyphics) and also provides the compass 
that shows the possible exits. As though all this isn't 
enough, most of the screens are animated! Clouds float 
across the sky, the desert scrolls when you move about 
the camel blinks and chews its cud, the water flows 
through the canal and the whole room shakes when you 
return the sceptre. The secret chamber is particularly 
impressive and you 1 ll probably have a good laugh when 
you ride the camel And the most amazing thing of all is 
that it runs in only 16k! 

General Hints: The aim of the game is very clearly 
spelled out in the instructions, so make sure you read 
them before you begin, I don't think Sands of Egypt was 
meant to be easy, for you begin the game empty-handed 
in the middle of a nwe! You can find yourself wandering 
around hopelessly lost for ages before you even find 
anything This really puts beginners off (although beginners 
shouldn't be wandering the Sands of Egypt in the first 
place}, so here are a few general hints, 

When you begin the game, keep heading north until 
you reach the top of a cliff, head west until you find an 
object then head north, From this point, you're on your 
own, but at least you've got an object to help you find your 
way around. Don't waste too much time drawing a map at 
this stage as you begin to get thirsty after 30 moves, After 
45 moves, you begin to get very thirsty. After 60 moves, 
you start dying of thirst and after 75 moves, you're dead. 
The moral here should be obvious. Find water! 

Once you've quenched your thirst (and it's not as easy 
as it sounds), you may like to collect all the objects you can 
lay your hands on, then return to the desert areas and 
map them out. Once everything is mapped, you'll feel 
more secure when moving around and you can concen- 
trate on solving the puzzles, The puzzles themselves are 
all fairly logical but finding the right words to use is 
sometimes a bit trying. The only other hint I'll give at this 
point is to make sure you examine every object and say 
HELP in every location 

If you type SCORE at any point during the game, you 
can see how many moves you've taken. When you 
eventually finish the game, you'll be told how many 
moves you took to complete it The author claims to have 




by Garry Francis, Australia 

done it in 101 moves, but 1 reckon he's having us on! My 
best is 1 1 1 moves and I cant see anywhere that it can be 
improved. If anyone out there can beat my score, I'd like 
to see your solution. 

Incidentally, there are a number of one letter commands 
apart from N, S, E, W, U and D which you can use to save 
typing. These are H for Help, 1 for Inventory, L for Look Q 
for Quit, P for Put (or droP) and T for Take (or get). 

The Curse of Ra: Unfortunately, Sands of Egypt is not 

without its flaws. There is one insidious bug in the 
program which had me stumped for months. It doesn't 
surface until after you've found your way into the secret 
chamber very late in the game. If you've made it that far 
and you couldn't get the ladder back through the crack, 
then lucky you! You've found the bug! [Perhaps this is the 
Curse of Ra?) 

When David Will Henderson encountered it, he wrote 
to the CONTACT column in Issue 8 for he I p. I responded 
to David's plea in the Readers' Letters of Issue 10. At the 
time, I said that the bug occurred randomly and for no 
apparent reason. This is not true. After further testing, I 
now believe I know why the bug occurs and how to 
overcome it So if you are interested, read on... 

In order to make Adventures a little more difficult (and 
realistic), there is usually a limit on the number of items 
you can carry about. Sands of Egypt is no exception and 
limits you to six items. The Adventure programmer 
normally handles this by allocating a specific location in 
memory to keep track of the number of items in the 
player's possession. If the program is written in BASIC, 
then he may use a variable instead In any case, for the 
sake of convenience, let's refer to this location (or 
variable) as COUNT. 

When the program begins, COUNT is initialised to the 
number of items in the player's possession, [n Sands of 
Egypt, you begin empty-handed, so COUNT is zero, 
Every time you try to pick up an item, the GET routine 
tests COUNT If COUNT is at its maximum, then you're 
told that you're carrying too much and you can't pick the 
object up. On the other hand, if COUNT is less than its 
maximum, then the object is added to your inventory and 
COUNT is incremented, When you want to drop an 
object the DROP routine puts the object in the current 
room and COUNT is decremented, 

So far, so good. 

Unfortunately, Sands of Egypt has one special case for 
the DROP routine which (I suspect) hasn't been handled 
properly, If you have satisfied all the necessary conditions 
when you try to DROP SCEPTRE in the outer chamber. 












PAGE 6 - issue 13 



19 



the program asks 1 Where?", If you respond correctly, the 
sceptre is dropped, but because this Is a special case and 
not part of the general DROP routine, COUNT is not 
decremented! THIS IS THE BUG COUNT should be 
decremented to reflect the new number of items. This 
means that you may now have (say) two items in your 
possession, but COUNT still thinks you 1 ve got three! Keep 
this in mind for a moment. Apart from keeping a tally of 
your inventory, COUNT is also useful for testing the 
validity of other actions. For example, you are not allowed 
to c I im b the pa Im t ree carry in g m ore t h an one item. I f yo u 
say CLIMB TREE, the CLIMB routine will first ensure that 
COUNT is less than or equal to one. If COUNT is greater 
than one, you will be told that your load is too heavy to 
climb the tree. Similarly, you cant enter the crack to and 
from the secret chamber while carrying more than two 
items. Therefore, if you are carrying the torch and ladder 
(as you must) when you try to leave the secret chamber, 
but COUNT thinks you've got three items (due to the 
bug), then you cannot possibly take the ladder out of the 
secret chamber! 

Fortunately, there is a way of defeating the bug, Apart 
from dropping individual items, Sands of Egypt also 
allows you to drop everything by saying DROP ALL If 
you do this after putting the sceptre in its proper place, 
then everything is dropped and COUNT is set to zero. 
You can now GET and DROP items in the nomial 
man n er and CO UNT wi 1 1 agai n ref I ect the correct n um b e.r 
of items in your inventory. It is now possible to take the 
ladder from the secret chamber and ultimately complete 
the game. 

Coded Hints: If any of our more observant readers 
thought the hints for Original Adventure and Zork I were 
in a funny order, it was because Les got them all mixed up 
when pasting up the magazine. In order to avoid that 
happening in future, the hints are now numbered, but 
otherwise follow the same format as usual. 

Incidentally, the word next to number 77 in the Zork I 
hints somehow went astray. It should have been a period 
(or full stop or dot or whatever you want to call it}. The 
poor thing was so small, that it probably fell off the page! 
(Actually it was painted nut on the negatiue by the 
piatemaker who thought it was merely a nasty blemish 1 
Ed.) 




1) Can't get past the 
snake? 

20 11 6 14 48 37 57 14 

2) Can't get the snake oil? 
31 37 25 

3) Cant find a container? 
18 133 20 14 

4) Can't find any water? 
18152143214721133 
20 32 52 20 29 

5) Cant get to the 

pyramid? 
7 20 41 

6) Camel won't co- 
operate? 

7 20 34 53 

7) Cant get the palm 
fronds? 

7 20 54 

8) Camel still won't co- 
operate? 

16 30 45 5 36 

9) Can't get the sceptre? 
4 26 39 30 51 20 14 

10) Haven't found the 
underground canal? 

4 26 2 20 35 

11) Still haven't found the 
underground canal? 

45 40 8 24 



12) Missing a 

source? 

4 26 56 52 20 19 



light 



13) Cant light the torch? 
4 26 13 20 17 52 20 29 

14) Still can't light the 
torch? 

28 

15) Can't move the boat 
upstream? 

45 12 

16) Boat floats away when 
you enter the archway? 
38 5 49 

17) Missing a rope? 

55 10 22 13 20 17 52 20 
29 36 

18) Can't find the secret 

chamber? 
44 20 23 

19) Cant get the ladder out 
of the secret chamber? 

46 9 8 7 50 

20) Cant get out of the 

underground canal? 
16 30 55 20 42 36 

21) Think you've done 
everything, but the games 
not over? 

18 27 37 41 3 



1 


EAST 


11 


ONLY 


21 




31 


FIND 


41 


CAMEL 


51 


FOUND 


2 


BY 


12 


SHOVEL 


22 


HAPPENED 


32 


TOP 


42 


LADDER 


52 


OF 


3 


RIDE 


13 


AT 


23 


H1EHOGLYPHICS 


33 


FROM 


43 


WEST 


53 


TREE 


■1 


SAY 


14 


SNAKE 


24 


SCEPTRE 


34 


PALM 


44 


HEED 


54 


PYRAMID 


5 


IT 


15 


DOWN 


25 


CONTAINER 


35 


POOL 


45 


EXAMINE 


55 


REMEMBER 


6 


GOOD 


16 


DJD 


26 


HELP 


36 


7 


46 


DROP 


56 


NORTH 


7 


TRY 


17 


BASE 


27 


FOR 


37 


A 


47 


SOUTH 


57 


DEAD 


8 


AND 


18 


GO 


28 


SUNLIGHT 


38 


TIE 


48 


IS 






9 


AI.I. 


19 


START 


29 


CLIFF 


39 


WHERE 


49 


UP 






10 


WHAT 


20 


THE 


30 


YOU 


40 


COVER 


50 


AGAJN 







20 



Games 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Bomb Escape 



The object is to escape from a building to a safe black 
square before a time bomb explodes. 

The Budding ■ an outline of a building is given in blue 
with some of the doors only one pixel wide Extra rooms, 
corridors and, sometimes, doors are seen at and above 
levels three and five The blue walls must not be touched 
at any level. 

The Timei - is ticki ng away at t h e bottom of the screen. It 
is reset if the black square is reached or if the bomb 
explodes. If a life is lost then the timer continues from the 
same position. It is not reset to zero. On each new level the 
timers fuse is shortened and is not lengthened again 
during the game. 

The Player ■ leaves a red trail which must not be touched 
The joystick directly controls the speed of the timer - as 
long as the player is moving the timer is slowed down It is 
a necessity to keep moving at level 5 and above- 
Lives ■ the game starts with three lives and a life is lost if a 
red or blue square is touched or if the bomb explodes. If a 
life is lost then one level is also lost and the game 
continues at this easier level but with less time 

available 

General - an average score of 55,000 is easily possible 
reaching level 6, however progression beyond this point 
is difficult and requires expert joystick control. 

j. REM »W*MMMKHttMM»tKKXttltMMKWKMl(MMMHi i»» 
REM ** BOMB ESCAPE *» 

REM ** BY - ** 

REM ** R.f .5HITH. 1984 ** 

REM ** ** 

REM ** PAGE 6 MAGAZINE - ENGLAND ** 
rem MimxiiMKmmxumtxiiMMmiMMiiKicwm i mtM 

10 GOTO 1000 

20 C0UNT=8 : Xi=8 : Yl=47 : TIME=1008 : LEVELS 

i:l_IVES=3 

30 GOTO SO 

40 COUI*T=0:H1=0:TIME=TIME-HHI:IF TINE< 

400 THEN TIME=400 

50 GRAPHICS Z1;P0KE 712,30:POKE 708,13 

0:POKE 789,0:POKE 710,48 

60 RESTORE 

70 K3-INT CRN6 t0>*8+241 I Y3=IHT IRHD C0J«i 

0+151 :X2=INT(RND (01*7+72) : Y2=INT IRHD (0 

1*5+11 

108 COLOR l:PL0T 8,47:f>RAKTO 0,8;DRAMT 

7 9,Q:DRAHT0 79 ,47: PLOT 0,45:DRAWTO 7 

5,45 

118 PLOT 5,I9:FQR E=i TO 2HREAD A,B:D 

RAWT0 A,B:NEMT E 

120 DATA 5,11,13,11,13,4,45,4,45,7,59, 

7,59,3,71,3,71,7,77,7,77,35,71,35,71,4 

1,59,41,59,37,45,37,45,41,13,41,13,35 

138 DATA 5,35,5,24 

140 PLOT 65,24:F0R E=l TO 15:REAP A,B: 



2 
3 

4 
5 

6 

7 



by Ron Smith 

The timet is controlled by the variables COUNT and 
TIME COUNT is increased on line 600 and each time it 
passes the value of TIME, the program plots another pixel 
on the timer. TIME is set to 1000 at the start of the game 
and reduces on line 40 by steps of 100 to a minimum of 
400. If either of these variables are altered, then the timer 
would be lengthened or shortened. DOOR plots two 
doors at random and is set on line 300. 




DRAHTO A, B: NEXT E;G0T0 480 
150 DATA 85,31,43,31,43,21,43,24,37,24 
,37,20,23,26,23,13,37,13,37,15,43,15,4 
3,19,43,9,85,9,65,13 

168 COLOR l:FOR E=i TO 7: READ A,B,C,D: 
PLOT A,B:DRAHTD €,D:KEXT E:RETURN 
176 DATA 7,19,23,19,35,4,35,11,46,19,6 
3,19,66,19,76,19,8,24,23,24,23,28,23,3 

4,23,35,59,35 

180 COLOR 1:F0B E=l TO 7:READ A,B,C,D: 
PLOT A,D:DRAMT0 C,D:HEXT E 
190 DATA 15,35,23,35,43,17,51,17,53,19 
,53, 13, 65, 19, 6b, 19, 65, 11, 75, 11, 37, 26, 3 
7,33,43,11,43,7 
20O FOR E=l TO 9:«EAD A,B:PL0T A,8:NEX 

T E: RETURN 

218 DATA 77,19,62,4,62,5,68,4,68,5,65, 

7,65,8,69,9,69,10 

300 DOOR=RRDC05 :IF DOOR>0.5 THEN C0LOB 

OiPLOT 38, 4: PLOT 65, 18: RETURN 
358 COLOR 3:PL0T O,47:DBAMT0 X1,Y1:RET 
URN 
480 IF LE0EL>2 THEN SOSUB 160:GO5U« 30 

8 

418 IF LEVEL>4 THEN GOSUB 180:GO5UB 38 



420 IF LIUE5<3 THEN GOSUB 358 

438 COLOR 2! PLOT K2,Y2: COLOR 3: PLOT X3 

,Y3 






PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



21 



440 POKE 77,0tS=STICK(0J 

456 IF 3=18 THEN GOTO 600 

460 X3=H3+C5=5 OR 5=6 OR S=7J-tS=9 OR 

5=10 OR 5=11) 

470 Y3=Y3+(5=5 OR 5=9 Oft 5=13) ~CS=6 OR 

5=10 OR 5=143 
460 H-X3iY=Y3 
490 COLOR 3 t LOCATE X,Y,Z 
500 IF Z=3 OR Z=l THEN GOTO 700 
510 IF Z=Z THEN GOTO 900 
520 PLOT H,Y 

600 COUNT=CQUHT*<LEVEL«5)+50:IF COUNT> 
TIHE THEN G05UB 650 

610 50UND 0,160, 10, 6:50UMD 1,200,10,6: 
SOUND 0,0, 0,6: SOUND 1,0,0,6: GOTO 440 
650 COLOR 3: PLOT HI, VI : SOUND 0,100,10, 
14:Xl=Xl+2 

660 IF XI>79 THEN G0SU8 060 
670 CDUHT=0: SOUND 0,0,0,0:RETURN 
700 FOR P-255 TO 20 STEP ~2:P0KE 710,1 
5: POKE 7«6,P:50UltD , P,0 , 10 : POKE 710,4 
0:NEXT P:50UND 0,0,0,0:605110 040 
710 SOUND 0,0,0,0: SOUND 1,0,0,0: GOTO 5 


060 FOR P=30 TO 2O0:PQKE 710,15;P0KE 7 
12,P!S0UND 0,P,0,10:POKE 710,32:NEXT P 
:50UH0 0,0,0,0 ;G05UB 640 

830 count=o:xi=o:goto 50 

040 LIME5=LIVE5l:IF LI¥E5=0 THEN GOTO 

1100 
850 LEMEL=LEOEL-l:IF LEVEL=0 THEN LEVE 
L=l 

060 RETURN 

300 GRAPHICS 10: POKE 712,3l;LE u EL=LEUE 
L*l I 5C=SC+ 1 (LEVEL*5) *5O0- CX1*5) »2> 
^10 POSITION 5,4:? 86;" LEVEL "JLEVEL:P 
OSITION 5,6:? flfij "SCORE ";SC 
920 FOR DE-1 TO 5! FOR P=106 TO 66 STEP 

-2: SOUND 0,f>, 10,10 t SOUND 1,P+5,10,1O: 
NEXT P:NEXT DE 

930 SOUND 0,0,O,0:5OlJND 1,Q,0,0:GOTO 4 
6 

1000 GRAPHICS 18: POKE 712,31: POKE 700, 
40: POKE 709,15 

1010 POSITION 6,2!? »6;"B" : GOSUD 1090; 
POSITION 12,4:? BSi-'P 11 :G0SU8 IflSOiPOSI 
TION 6,4 5? tJOfS" 

1020 G0SU6 1090;POSITION 12,2:? B6;"B" 
IGOSUB 1090SP05ITIOH 4,4:? tt6;"E":G0SU 
B 1090: POSITION 14,4!? tt6;"E" 
1030 GOSUB 1090: POSITION 10,2!? tt6;"M" 
:G05UB 1090: POSITION 8,4:? «6; ,, C" :GOSU 
B 1090: POSITION 0,2:? tt6; M fl 
1040 G05UB 10?O:POSITIOH 10,4:? W^T'O" 



iGOSUfi 1050 

1850 DIH nSClSJ :AS="BY R .F . 5HITH ," :FOR 
X=l TO 13:PD5ITI0H X+2,7:? tt6;A$CX,X> 
:GOSUB 1890: NEXT X 

1055 FOR H=l TO 500:NEXT HlPOSITlON 3, 
7:? »6y" " 

1060 FOR H=I TO 300: NEXT Hi POSITION 4, 

7:? tie; "press start" 

1070 FOR C=191 TO IS STEP ~16;P6KE 709 
,C+16:IF PEEK (532791 ~6 THEN SOUND 0,0, 
0,0:GOTO 20 

1000 SOUND O,C/12+10,1Q,10:FOR H=l TO 
50:MEHT HrHEHT C:GOTD 1870 
1690 SOUND 0,140, 2, 10; FOR H=l TO 50: HE 
XT HiSOUND 0,0,0, 8:F0R H=l TO 50:NEXT 
M: RETURN 

1100 GRAPHICS 10 SPOKE 712 , 31 : POKE 709, 
15IP0KE 708,34:P0KE 710,34:POKE 711,34 
:SOUHD 0,0,0,0:SOUMD 1,0,0,0 
1110 IF SOHI THEN HI=5C 

1120 POSITION 8,0:? HOj'^OCH" ! POSITION 
7,1:? tt6;"EQgAfai"S POSITION 3,7:? tt6;" 

sggpg ";sc 

1130 POSITION 3,8;? ttO^'QHSaSlRa "jHI 
1140 FOR H=l TO 500: NEXT Hi POSITION 4, 
4:? tt6; "press start" 

1150 FOR C=I91 TO 15 STEP 16: POKE 711 
,C+6:P0KE 718,C-6:P0KE 709, C+15 : POKE 7 
60,0-8 

1160 IF PEEKC53279)=6 THEN 1160 
1170 SOUND 8,0/2+10, 10, 1Q:50UND l,C/2, 
10,10:FOR H=l TO 50 f NEXT H:HEXT CjGOTO 

1150 
1180 SOUND 0,0,0,0! SOUND 1,0 , , : SC=0 : 
GOTO 26 n 



DO YOU RUN A USER GROUP? 



Atari will in future be producing a quarterly 
newsletter for User Groups keeping them up to 
date with the latest developments. To make sure 
your group gets this newsletter write NOW to Jon 
Dean at ATARI CORP. (UK) Limited, Atari House, 
Railway Terrace, Slough, Berks, SL2 5BZ and let 
him have details of your group. 



22 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Printer Utility 



Li a 1020 handler device 



We bought an ATARI 1020 printer earlier this year 
Since then the price has fallen considerably! We have 
used the printer a great deal, mainly for programming but 
we have written one or two graphics programs 
ourselves. 

A printer makes writing large programs feasible on a 
home computer, no more scribbling down odd lines of 
code on scraps of paper. You can debug your programs 
as they ought to be debugged. Get a listing, retire to an 
armchair, read and think 

In general we are satisfied with the printer. In general 
that is. It gives clear, readable text, easier on the eyes than 
that produced on many mainframes, flexible graphics 
and i$ fast enough for the applications we wanted. A 
business user would probably find speed a drawback 
though. There is however one problem with the printer - 
the documentation is terrible. It is so bad that even a 
casual perusal reveals its inadequacies. We have 
therefore spent some time trying to find out how far you 
can stretch the printer, with some success, and this article 
records some of our findings. 

Since, as far as we know, there are no programs on sale 
which use the 1020 printer, one of the first ways in which 
you can use your printer is to list your own programs. 

Early on it struck us how inappropriate is the size of text 
for program listings, it is too large. Our bookshelves began 
to look like Roman libraries with scrolls of code many feet 
long To get to the subroutine you wanted in a long 
program meant unravelling many feet of paper. How 
much nicer if the text could be printed in the smallest 
character size available, 80 characters per line. Ideal for 
assembler listings and a great improvement for BASIC 
ones. 

We set about trying to do this. Our first attempt, 
successful but cumbersome, was to write the listing file to 
disc and then use a program to read in the file and write it 
to the printer, preceded by ESOCNTL-S, the magic 
formula for getting small letters on the printer This 
involved reading and writing large files - slow. We tried 
various other tacks, including HSC-CNTL-S as a 
comment in the program and using a vertical blank 
interrupt to write ESOCNTL-S, until we finally came up 
with a workable solution. 

The problem is that when confronted with a command 
LIST L 'R" to print a listing the Operating System first 
closes then re-opens the printer, thus setting default 
values and defeating any chicanery you may have been 
up to. The solution was to define a new input handler " L" 
whose only function is to print in small letters We steal 
most of the code provided by the Operating System for 
the printer, "R", but substitute our own code for the 
OPEN routine. When we set up"L", we open the printer 
then print ESOCNTL-S. (Note that because "R" and"L" 
share code and buffers, it is dangerous to have them 
OPEN at the same time - not that I can see any reason for 
doing so.) 



by David and Mary Lynch 



There are a couple of additional frills. How about being 
able to forget about setting up "L" each time we turn on 
the computer? We can do this by making the program into 
a "DiAUTORUN.SYS" file which is executed 
automatical ly by DO Son power u p (This of course works 
only if you have a disc drive). In addition, we do not want 
our facility ruined by pressing SYSTEM RESET and we 
can stop this by placing the address of the set up routine in 
RUNAD ($2 E0,$2E1 ), which is executed when SYSTEM 
RESET is pressed 

For those with assembler editors, a listing of the code is 
included. Save the object code as "D; ALITOR UN. SYS". 
The print out is of the assembler listing rather than the 
source so that the BASIC program may be more 
understandable. 

The program occupies the end of page 6 - $6A0 to 
$6 FF If you don't mind SYSTEM RESET destroy ing'L", 
$6 DC to $6FF is all that needs preserving 

The BASIC program does the same thing The first two 
numbers in line 1070 are a header for the file, The follow- 
ing four numbers are the addresses of the start and end of 
the routine in decimal. There follows the machine code 
down to line 1200. Line 1210 inserts the address of the 
routine in place so that SYSTEM RESET will restore 
"L". 

Type in the program as listed SAVE it as "LBAS" and 
then RUN the program with a disk in the drive containing 
DOS. Turn off the computer and turn it on again. If all has 
gone well you should now have set up "L", Try LOAD 
"LBAS" then LIST'L" and you should get a listing of the 
program in letters 80 characters to a line, 

LPR1NT does not appear to work very well with the 
1 020. While you can print normal Size (40 characters per 
line), the special facilities, such as changing print size, do 
not work I suspect that this is because when BASIC meets 
an LPRINT statement, it closes and opens the printer, so 
destroying control commands that you have sent it 
previously. 

The solution is to amend programs containing LPRINT 
as follows: 

a Precede the first LPRINT statement executed in the 
program by CLOSE #7: OPEN #7,8,0, "Pi" 

b. Replace all LPRINTs by PRINT #7; 

Ihaveamendedthe TIN YTEXT program toenableitto 
use the 1020 printer. In my version, lines 700, 725, 727, 
830, 870, 885 and 3 1 30 require changing in the way that 
I have explained 1 hope that this updated version of 
TIN YTEXT can be made available to readers of PAGE 6. 
{I hope to publish a revised and updated version of 
TINYTEXT early next year, if any other readers have 
modified or improved the program i would appreciate a 
copy. Ed.) 









PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



23 



} Li PRINTER HANDLER 



David ft Man 



1&38 OPEN tt2,8,0,"D:A|JTGRUll,5YV 
1648 TRAP 1066; FOR 1=1 TO 65536 
1850 READ Of PUT 112,1};? OlHEXT I 
1868 END 

1670 DATA 255,255,166,6,255,6,165 
1888 DATA 12,141,182,6,165,13,141 
1058 DATA 103,6,165,101,133,12,165 
1168 DATA 6,133,13,50,176,3,32,184 
1110 DATA 6,160,8,185,26,3,201,0,240 
1120 DATA 5,208,200,208,152,34,280 
1130 DATA 242, 56,96, 169, 76, 153, 26 
1148 DATA 3,280,169,226,153,26,3,280 
11S0 DATA 169,6,153,26,3,56,234,6 
1168 DATA 219,238,157,230,166,230 
1178 DATA 126,238,157,238,76,120,230 
1108 DATA 32,159,238,169,27,32,167 
1198 DATA 238,169,19,32,107,238,169 
1288 DATA 155,32,167,230,160,1,96 
1218 DATA 224,2,225,2,168,6 



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* COMPUTE-A-WIN * 

USE YOU R ATARI 1 6K/4H K TO SELECT Wl NNER S 

ALL YEAR ROUND 
2 COMPLETE PROGRAMS FOR THE PRICE OF I 

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Each proguni MWfi aJJ trick* In England & Scotland, 

Each a«ll conla Lned profftam bJIdu/c, choice -of 

1. QUICK selection ■ using any dally newspaper 

{no racing knowledge required) 

2. SPECIALIST selection - uting Information given In a pop- 
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tage, tralnet/jDcbey ratings., speed rating* etc., etc. 

CASSETTE ONLY hftmr L O w MAC SOFTWARE 

4 CROWLEY GARDENS 
£6.95 BLAYDON-ON TYNE NE21 SEJ 



ATARI 400/800/XL 

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into serial I/O sockel. Compatible with ATAR [WRITER, VlSICALCetc. 
Includes all cables plus extension I/O socket, Powered direcfly from 
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CASSETTE INTERFACE. Plugs into serial I/O socket With two 
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Send *.a.c for full informal inn. 
Dealer enquiries welcome, 

BLACKTHORN ELECTRONICS 

Ardleigh Road, Dedham, Colchester, Essex 

Tel: Colchester (0206) 323120 



ARE YOU IN 
THE CLi 







.wont) i ipit 

.EJH 



n 



If not. now is your chance to join 

the largest ATARI computer 

owners club in the U.K. Take 

advantage of the special 

offers and software library 

exchange scheme. Just £4 

entitles you to receive four 

issues of the club newsletter, 

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articles and also includes 

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you to type in and enjoy. 

These professionally produced 32 page newsletters axe 

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Join now, don't be left out in the cold Send a £4 

cheque/P.O,. made payable to the club, to enrol you as a 

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Single copies are available for £1 plus 30p postage and 

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The U.K. ATARI Computer Owners Club. 
P.O. Box 3, Rayleigh, Essex. 



24 



Games 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Camelot 



Go forth, brave knight, to rescue yonder damsel held 
captive high in the towers of a mighty castle, The way is 
not easy but persevere and battle through and the 
maidens favours shall be yours, 

Camelot is a five screen game requiring 32k in which 
you control the knight as he runs around the castle 
attempting to reach the maiden. He can climb up and 
down 1 add e rs a n d j um p fro rn wa lis bu t nee d s to b e prec ise 
in his movement. On each level he must find and collect a 
key in order to open the door at the bottom right and so 
progress to the next screen. Obstacles include falling 
firebombs, eerie and barely visible bats, wafer and huge 
yellow spider monsters Contact with any of these will 
prove fatal 

Each screen is straightforward though progressively 
more difficult but on the final screen you must first collect 
the sword in order to cross the water. There is a time limit 
for each screen and the score is based on the amount of 
time left at the end of each completed screen. 

The way is difficult but it can be done Go forth, brave 
knight! 



id REM *** *HW*WMMHMMXWHMMWHWHHMMM)<)(XM 

11 REM 

12 REM 

13 REM 

14 REM *■ ^BB^E 

15 REM 



CAMELOT by ALLAN KNOPP 



WITH A5SI5TAHCE FROM 



JU5TIN KNDPP 



PAGE 6 MAGAZINE - ENGLAND 



16 REM MHWKMMKtt***WW*M)<MXXMHM W K*MMMMM 

140 REM 

105 GOTO 1405 

110 DIM AC8»,R$Cl),F5C15) : GOSUB 1505 

115 RESTORE 1450 

120 REM » 



PMMOUE ROUTINE #T0M HUDSON* 



ANALOG MAGAZINE 



125 DIM PMMO«5«100> ,P85tl4J ,PlSll71 ,P2 
$(56? ,f»3$«12) ;MDUE=ADRlPMM0V5J ;F0R Kl 

TO 106: READ N:PMMOVS(X*=CHR$tH):NEXT 
X 

130 REM READ SHAPE DATA 

135 FOR N=l TO 16: READ N :P0S CXJ =CHR5 (N 
J :HEMT H 

140 FOR H = l TO 14 1 READ 
) :HEHT X 

145 FOR X=I TO 56:READ 
1 :HEXT H 

150 FOR X-l TO 115 READ N : P3S (X) CH«$ CN 
> iNEXT X 
155 PMBA5E=INT C (PEEK (145J +3J/4)*4 :P0KE 

54279, PHBA5E 
100 PMB=PMBA5E*256 

165 PMD=ADR(P0$) :REtt PM DATA ADDRESS 
170 HAT=ADR1PlS) 
175 BAT-ADR(P2SJ 
100 BQM-ADR(P3SJ 



N:P15£H) CHRSCN 
N:P2$CX5=CHR$IH 



by Allan Knopp 



185 POKE 555,46 SPOKE 53277,3 :REM PM DM 

A 

170 POKE 704 ,124! POKE 705,110; POKE 706 

,211! POKE 7*7,54! POKE 708 ,06: POKE 710, 

6:P0K£ 711,122 

195 POKE 623,1 

200 5C=1:L=4:SC0=B:P0KE 53277,2 

265 GOTO 1285 

210 OM SC GOSUB 920 ,$80 , 555 , 000 , 1045 

215 POSITION 0,23:? »6 ; "1141141 "J5G;" 

": POSITION 9,23:? 06; "lil!l±J ":!;•' ":P 

OKE 53278,1 

220 K=0 

225 X=48!Y=94 

230 XA=190:YA=64:XB=140:YB=4O 

235 XC=100!YC=6O 

240 S=5TIGKC0J 

245 TIM=TlM-2: POSITION 0,0:? ttt;"EH033 
■■jtim;" ":if tin-6 then L=0 







250 X=X+tS=7 AND X <2O03*8- CS"11 AND X> 
40)*8 : &X= tX-4B> /B : GY= < Y-16> /4 : IF GY>20 

THEN GY=2B:IF Y<94 THEN Y=94 
255 IF PEEKC53260)>0 THEN GOTO 520 
260 LOCATE GX , GV+1 , CJ LOCATE GX,GY+2,D 
265 IF C=16S THEN GOSUB 495 
270 IF C=64 THEN V=Y+(S=13 AND Y<96)*4 
-tS=14 AND Y>163*4 

275 IF C=247 THEN K=I: COLOR 32: PLOT GX 
,GY+l:FGR S=l TO 4 : SOUND 2 , 10 , 10,15 : FO 
R H-l TO 30: NEXT M: SOUND 2, 0,0,0: NEXT 
5 
200 REM 



IN PRECEDING LINE USE C. AS 



ABBREYIATION FOR COLOR 



285 IF €=249 OR C=231 AND K=l THEN SC- 
SC*l:SC0=SC0+TIH:L=L + 2; GOSUB 1280 I GOTO 

210 
290 IF D=32 THEN Y=V+« 

295 IF C=106 OR 0=106 THEN GOSU0 1255: 
GOTO 540 
300 IF D=192 THEN V=Y-8 



PAGE 6- Issue 13 



25 



305 IF C=71 OR D=75 THEN GOSUB 1155 

310 IF C-258 THE* GOSUB 1165: GOSUB 128 

6: GOTO 1170 

315 IF Y>94 THEN Y=94 

320 A=U5RCfWVE,0,PHB,PHD,X,Y,10J 

325 IF S<>15 THEM SOUND 0,25,12 , 15 : FOR 

K=l TO 5 3 NEXT H; SOUND 0,8,8,0 

330 IF PEEK (53275) =3 THEN GOTO 490 

335 VI=6-irr(RHDCi)*2) 

340 YA=YA+YI 

345 IF Yfl<5 THEN YA-100 

350 IF Yft>100 THEN YA=5:G0T0 445 

355 A=USR (MOVE , 1 , PKB , MAT , HA , YA, 14) 

366 SOUND l,40-YA/3,8,4 

365 POKE 77,0 

370 XJ=INT(RND(0)*16) : YJ=1-INT (RND (0)« 

53 

375 XB=KB*XJ; YB=YB+YJ 

3«0 IF XB<40 THEN XB=200 

3B5 IF XB>200 THEM XB=40 

390 IF YB<0 THEN YB=120 

395 A=USR (HOVE , 2 , PHB , BAT , KB , YB , 563 

4O0 YK=10-IHTCRND(O)K5) 

405 YC=YC*YK 

410 IF YC<10 THEN YC=110 

415 IF VOllB THEN YC=18:G0T0 450 

420 A=USR(NDVE,3,PHB,B0H,X€,YC,11) 

425 IF SC=2 AND PEEK (53770) > 40 THEN GO 

SUB 545 

430 IF 5C-2 AND PEEK (537703<40 THEN GO 

SUB 550 

435 IF L<1 THEN TIH~0: GOSUB 1280: GOTO 

455 

440 GOTO 240 

445 XA-IHT (RND (03*120) +70: GOTO 240 

450 XC=INTCRND (01*120)470: GOTO 240 

455 IF SC0+TIH>H5C THEN H5C=5C0+TIH 

460 POKE 53277,0 

46 5 POSITION 2,5:? tt6 ; " SCORE ";SCO+ 

TIHi POSITION 2,7:? »6 ; "ll**H3ni ";H5C 

470 SOUND 1,0,0,0 

475 position 0,22:? 06 ; » press star 

X " 

400 IF PEEK (53279) <>6 THEN 480 

405 POSITION 0,22:? tt6; M 
■ ■ 

490 TIH=0:G0SU6 1280; GOTO 200 

495 IF 5=7 THEN K=X-8:IF X<48 THEN K=4 



500 IF 5=11 THEN H=H+8 

505 IF S=14 THEN Y=¥+4 

510 IF 5=13 OR 5=15 THEN Y=Y~4:IF Y<20 

THEN Y=20 
515 RETURN 

520 POKE 53270, l:L=L-l:X=48:Y=:94:F0R S 
=1 TO 40: SOUND 3,5, 10,12 :NEHT S: SOUND 
3,0,0,0 :IF K=l THEN GOSUfi 1255 
525 A=U5RCMOUE,O,PMB,PMb,X,Y,10) 
538 VB=YB+10 



535 A=U5R (HOVE , 2 > PHB , BAT , XB , Yfi , 50) : GOT 

215 

540 FOR Z=l TO 4B:50UND 3 , Z, 6 , 14 : NEXT 

Z:50UND 3, 0, 0,0 :1=L-1 : GOTO 215 

545 POSITION 6,6:? tt6 ; "QH 11 : POSITION 9, 

2:? HO; IB": position 12,6:? tt6;"EE!":RE 

TURN 

550 POSITION 6,0:? tt6;" 1 : POSITION S, 

2:? »6;" ": POSITION 12,6:? «6; M *« :RE 

TURN 

555 REH 

568 TIH=TIH*600 

565 POSITION 0,2.'? 116 ;" 



DRAW SCREEN5 



V. Y. V, 



SCOP 



= S: we£m£n 
i<^* : = - 






I 



Ml 1 












K X 7. T. V. 



505 POSITION 0,6;? tt6;"g|G 



570 POSITION 0,3:? HO; 11 
575 POSITION 0,4:? 86 J "EC 

BHBB" 

580 POSITION 0,5:? B6 : "Vte VFAWA'AWAfflft 



WEI SI 



590 POSITION 0,?:? »6;"g<! fflOffl E2 (2 ffl 

So " 

595 POSITION 0,8:? tt6;"HG SOffl CH ffl 
660 POSITION 0,9:? tt6;"@0 QO GH 
605 POSITION 0,10:? tt6;"Se fflf! G0 S 

bgej " 

610 POSITION 0,11:? 86;"0G EG Q GQ 
615 POSITION 0,12:? »6;"SG fflGjffl GEJJ BJ 
620 POSITION 0,13:? tt6; M SG g|0 Gffl 

sea ■■ 

625 POSITION 0,14;? tt6;"HG 00 ffl Gffi 



630 POSITION 0,15:? tt6;"^G HG j Gffl © 

635 POSITION 0,16:? tt6;"&jG 0G S <*ffl ffl 

QGJ » 
640 POSITION 0,17:? tt6;"&8 fflG OQj 

fflGB) " 



26 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



CAMELOT continued 




760 POSITION 0,16:? 86; M ffleG06 



645 POSITION 6,18:? 86;"E}8 QJ0 Q 8 E 

ffloBJ " 
650 POSITION 0,1?:? 86;"BG CTo MSMHIMSEEH 



655 POSITION 0,28 r? 86 ; " Q We WA'AAAAAWA 

660 POSITION 8,21:? 86;" fflO 

665 POSITION 0,22:? 86 : " YAWAWm'AWAWJp&ty 

BBUB" 

670 COLOR 1655PL0T 13,2:DRAWT0 19,19iP 

osition i?,20;? tte; 1 ^": position 13,21; 

7 86;"E" 

675 RETURN 

680 FOR K-0 TO 22:COL0R 32:PL0T 8,X:DR 

AHTO 15, H: NEXT H 

665 TIM=TIH+600 

638 POSITION 8,2:? 86;"E S ©SHe 

635 POSITION 8,3 r? 86;"ffl Q -B G 

a a s m 

780 POSITION 8,4:? 86 : " ffiiiMKfil G <* 

aaaas" 

785 POSITION 8,5:? tt6;"ffl<» G 



710 POSITION 0,61? tt6;"SC^^^G GEEE! 

715 POSITION 0,7!? ff6 ; "fffiQZZZ G Q 

aa as" 

728 POSITION 6,8:? t!6 ; "Jflfl gCEBi Q 

aa a 11 

725 POSITION 0,S:? 86 ; "fflOfl EEEl a 

222 a" 

736 POSITION 6,18:? 86; "{208123 

5H H" 

735 POSITION 8,11:? 8&;--E22oHj J J J J 

j S3 QB" 

740 POSITION 0,12:? tt6; ' l fl&Q%EEggEESgEE& 



745 P Q5ITI0H 8,13:? Cfi :-KIHPfSBBCT»gg!BBH 

322H S" 

750 POSITION 0,14:? tt6; M Q08Q 

E 8 ffl" 

755 POSITION 6,15:? «ft : ■ Wpmo WMAWMWA 

a Qosaj" 



765 POSITION 0,17:? Hfi : "BEh*gH* K«ISI»5BK«BI 

■v 

776 POSITION 8,18:? B6 ; "H2O0G 

asaa" 

77 5 PO SITION 8,13 3? 86 j "WGWHWXfflMM 

9 SEEK" 

780 POSITION 8,28:? 86;" ^WtESMEESm 

H H" 

785 POSITION 8,21:? 86;" O WAA'AAAAAAAV 

a H" 

798 POSITION 8,22:? tt6 ; "flaagaflflflflflflflflfl 

795 RETURN 

860 FOR «=6 TO 22 J COLOR 32 ! PLOT 8,HiDR 

AHTO 19, H: NEXT X 

885 TIM=TIM+688 

818 POSITION 6,2;? 86;" 1 ■ | 1 B 1 

a*' 

815 POSITION 6,3:? 86;" VfiWAWAWAWAWm 
S26 POSITION 8,4:? 86;" BKBKBIH P 

S3B2E" 

825 POSITION 0,5:? 86;"" 8 VESXEEfc 




830 POSITION 8,6:? 86 ; "fflGBeE 



835 POSITION 8,7:? 86;"BGHGa 



Boffl 



acaa 



848 POSITION 

HEED" 

845 POSITION 

858 POSITION 

ffl" 
855 POSITION 

868 POSITION 

a a- 

865 POSITION 

a a- 

870 POSITION 

H2jS" 



6,8:? 86;" oaGaaaaaa aoaa 

8,9;? W)«W — sea 



o,io:? 86 ; "BjeQea 



hob 



8,n:? «<>:■' eaea aaaaaaoa 

8,12:? 86;"SefflO[2 BBBBEia ofa 
8,13:? 86; >> HqBgh QeQ 

6,14:? 86;" eEoQaaaaa sea 












PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



27 



875 POSITION ft, 151? tt6 ; "ftGfflOE^ gjogj 

888 POSITION 8,16:? 86 : "fiWaGEEW E^H3"S 



885 POSITION 8,17:? tt6;"EC0GHK EEEIB pEI 
ffl 0" 

838 POSITION 8,18:? ttfi ; "HO0G g 0^ 

895 POSITION 8,1?:? ttfe j-'EgEg QEffiQ GE 

B0jB" 
360 POSITION 6,26:? 86 ; ■' G0G BiSBBtSHiMBI 

ft" 

985 POSITION 8,21:? t*6 ;» QfflG HSSSSA 

H" 
918 POSITION 8,22:? H6;»^^^^^^ffi! 

315 RETURN 

328 TIM-4S0: POSITION 8,2:? 86;"0 fij Q 

B B ■ ffi 0" 
32$ POSITION 8,3:? 86 : " BB^mSB«BB«BH BtHl 

wir 

338 POSITION 6,4:? ttfi;" 

S" 

335 POSITION 8,5:? 86;"EG G 

0" 
346 POSITION 0,6:? 86 : "ElQBfiEHG gEBBKBW g 
BBBI 0" 

945 position 8,7:? v&-,'^WSMg£E8£Ml 

BEBI 0" 

350 POSITION 6,8:? 86;" 8 6 Q 

a Br 

955 POSITION 0,9 1? ttfi;" G G € 8 6 

6 E3 0" 

960 POSITION 0,10!? 86 H' KKBt P EEEEEEN l BEEl 

0GH2 ffl" 

365 POSITION 8,11:? 86 : « 'EEEIoEBEEEBoEBia 

00630 H" 

370 POSITION 6,12:? B6;" G 

e a Q" 

375 POSITION 8,13:? 86;"G G GO 

G S 0" 
380 POSITION 8,14:? tt6;"G^^QG^ftH^G 
B45MW ffl" 

385 POSITION 0,15:? tt6 ; "HWBmWBBmtl 

^ffl S2" 

990 POSITION 8,16:? M i u Q 

335 POSITION 8,171? tt6;"G G 

6 B 0" 
1806 POSITION 8,10:? 116 : "EEtapBEKEIflflnflffl 
QBCEE! 0" 
1805 POSITION 8 ,19 J? ttfi : "CTmrtTOfrffiffltiRffi 

1018 POSITION 0,20:? tt6;" G 

G BJ" 
1815 POSITION 8,211? H6;" 6 

1826 POSITION 0,22:? 86 : " EEEEEBKtiHKKBKi 
0H^M1" 



1025 FOR Z=l TO 2: POSITION <RMI><0)*10> 

,3i? Mi; 11 .!": KENT Z 
1836 FOR Z=l TO 2: POSITION CRHf>f8)«15) 

,13:? 86 I " j" : NEXT Z 
1835 FOR Z = l TO 2: POSITION CRND (81 *15J 

,17:? ttG;"j":NEHT Z 

1840 RETURN 

1845 TIM=TIM+300: POSITION 0,2:? »&;"% 

00 so) 1 ' 

1650 POSITION 0,3:? tt6 : " gBB3BJ 

EEt2 M 

1655 POSITION 8,4]? tt6;"E23G 

QUO" 
I860 POSITION 0,5:? 86;"SEJG 



1865 POSITION 0,6:? B6 ; '■gjeoEEEH 
1870 POSITION 0,7;? 86 ; --0ceiZZa2 



1875 POSITION 8,8:? ttfi ; " 



1880 POSITION 8,9:? ttfi ; 'W^EEl 

1685 POSITION 8,10:? ttfi;"08eBRj j j 

90S" 
1838 POSITION 8,11!? 86 :"HGO EEEKia 

000*" 
1095 POSITION 6,12:? 86 ; "0£JGOg£££j 

ffleffl" 

1186 POSITION 8,13:? ttfi : "BHOGBBEi 

aoffl" 

1185 POSITION 6,14:? 86 ; "EEEJgEEI 

080" 
1116 POSITION 8,15:? ttfi;"HH0G0 

aoa* 1 

1115 POSITION 0,16:? ttfi; "00000 

1120 POSITION 0,17:? 86;"B2GGE2 

60" 
1125 POSITION 8,18:? 86;"0GG00 K 

e0" 

1138 POSITION 8,1?:? tt6;"06GEHj0j j j 

j j ieS" 

1135 POSITION 8,28:? ttfi;" 8E 

1146 POSITION 8,21:? ttfi;" 6E 

1145 POSITION 0,22:? B6;"0^^^^^^ 

1158 RETURN 

1155 FOR Z=148 TO 8 STEP -2:S0UH0 0,Z, 

12,14:HEXT Z:SOUNO 0,0,6,8:PDSITI0N 5, 

i3:? nb\"wm^ffl^Bmk" 

1166 COLOR 32:PL0T GH , GY+2 : RETURN 
1165 £Q5U6 1280 
1178 REM DRAM CASTLE 

1175 COLOR 165:PL0T 6,6:DRAHT0 5,8:F0R 
Z=8 TO 4: PLOT 7+Z,7:DRAMT0 7+Z,22:NEK 
■ ^ continued overleaf 



v:/,V.d6A44d6d 



^tfdddddddd 



28 



PAGE 6 ■ Issue 13 



CAMELOT continued 

1180 PLOT 12,6:DRAHT0 12,8: COLOR 32;PL 
DT 0,23:DRftMT0 19 , 2 3 : POSITION 5,3:? 86 

;"QJM3H3" 

1185 COLOR 35:PL0T 8,4:C0L0fl 38:PL0T 8 

,5 

1190 COLOR 165: PLOT 8,6;PL0T 10,6 

1195 COLOR 32: PLOT 8,10:DRflHTG 0,14; PL 

OT 9,9:DRAMT0 9,14:PL0T 10,10iDRAHTO 1 

0,14 

1200 POSITION 10,13:? 86 ;"U": POSITION 

10,14:? 86 ^'S* 1 

1205 FOR X=H TO 120 STEP -l:G05UB 1250 

:NEXT K:GOT0 1225 

1210 SOUND 1,0,0,0 

1215 FOR K=M TO 126 STEP l:GOSUB 1250 

:NEHT HI GOTO 1225 

1220 FOR X=H TO 126:G0SUB 1250:NEHT K 

1225 IF V>64 THEN FOR Y=V TO 64 STEP - 

l:GOSUB 1250:KEHT YlGOTO 1245 

1230 FOR Tf=V TO 64: GO SUB 1250:HEXT V 

1235 FOR Z-0 TO 255: POKE 704, Z: SOUND 1 

,Z,14,14 :NEXT Z 

1240 FOR Z-255 TO STEP -l! SOUND 1,Z, 

14,14:NEHT Z 

1245 5C=1:P0P :POKE 704,138: GOTO 455 

1250 fl-y S R CMO VE , 8 , PHB , PHD , H , V , 10) : RETU 

RH 

1255 IF SC = 1 THE* POSITION 0,5;? tt6;*'E 
■• 

1260 IF SC=2 THEN POSITION 14,14:? tt6 ; 

1265 IF SC = 3 THEN POSITION 7,8:? 116 ; H E 

■■ 

1270 IF SC=4 THEN POSITION 8,21:? 86 ; » 

C" 

1275 RETURN 

1280 FOR Z=0 TO 22:C0L0R 32:PL0T 0,Z:D 

RAHTO 19,Z:NEXT Z:RETURN 

1205 POSITION 0,21? »6; "' tt 

n ■■ 

1250 POSITION 0,3:? 86;" ft&Q E S 

1295 POSITION 0,4;? «6j" 

1300 POSITION 0,5:? 86;" H2 ffl 

ffl Eg 1 

1305 
1310 

u 0" 

1315 

5 8' 

1320 



1335 POSITION 0,12:? 86;' 



KK^XcaMelotx 



POSITION 0,6T? tt6;" ffl a a 

POSITION 0,7:? 86;" Q w ft E 

position 0,8;? »&;■' 13 Eg 

POSITION 8,9:? 86;" E2205E EJ ffljS ffi 
EBeH3' 

1325 POSITION 0,18:? »6; n SHcEEEEEEEEEE 

1330 POSITION 0,11:? 8&;» m*Wfflffl!£m 



1348 POSITION 0,13;? 86;' 

EJ2GSH" 

1345 POSITION 0,14:? tt6;' 



1350 POSITION 0,15;? tt6;' 



1355 POSITION 0,16:? 86;' 



1360 POSITION 0,17:? ft6; a 



1365 POSITION 0,18S? B6f 
1370 POSITION 0,19:? B6J' 
1375 POSITION 0,28:? 86;' 

EEHO?B" 

1380 POSITION 0,21:? 86;' 



^oaaaaaaaaa 



S 

■ ■ ■ « yfl 
CTflflBEIB' ' ' 'gS 



ddddddddddddd 



ddddddddddddd 



ddddddddddddd 



ddddddddddddd 



1385 POSITION 0,22:? 86;'fjTB press sta 

rt GEE" 

1398 IF PEEKC53279J <>6 THEN 1350 

1395 GOSUB 12B8:GDT0 210 

1480 GOTO 1400 

1405 GRAPHICS 2: POSITION 6,4:? 86; "CAM 

ELOT" 

1410 POKE 708,56:P0KE 71O,0:POKE 709,1 

24: POKE 711,118 

1415 POKE 752,1 

1420 POSITION 2,6:? 86;"by allan hnopp 

■■: POSITION 2,7:? tt6 1 "EHlflimMlfC:" : P 

osition 3,8;? 1*6 ; "H iBaEiamag" 

1425 ? "PRESS SUB TO BEGIN 

Hami TO restart during 

GAHE" 
1430 IF PEEK (532791 <>6 THEH 1430 
1435 POSITION 2,2:? 86;"back in a hoh« 
nt" 

1440 FOR H=0 TO 150: SOUND 1,H,10,10;NE 
XT H: SOUND 1,6,0,0 
1445 GOTO 110 

1450 DATA 216,104,104,104,133,213,104, 
24,105,2,133,206,104,133,205,104,133,2 
04,104,133,203,104,104,133,208 
1455 DATA 104,104,133,209,104,104,24,1 
01,209,133,287,166,213,240,16,165,205, 
24 , 105 , 128 , 133 , 205 , 165 , 206 , 105 
1460 DATA 0,133,206,202,208,240,160,8, 
162,8 , 196 , 289 ,144,19,196, 207, 176 ,15,13 
2 , 212 , 138 , 168 , 177 , 203 , 164 
1465 DATA 212,145,285,232,169,8,240,4, 
169 ,0,145 , 205 , 200, 192 , 128 , 208, 224, 166 , 
213,165,208,157,0,288,96 

1470 DATA 16,57,49,57,201,175,73,125,1 
40,142 

1475 DATA 36,0,16,36,16,24,52,56,92,12 
6,98,102,60,24 continued on page 46 






PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



29 



SCREENDUMP 



These Microscreens were drawn by Roy Lynch from 
Liuerpoo) using Micropainter. Roy has been drawing 
on his Atari for nearly two years and has sent in a 
whole disk of pictures He is 1 7 years of age and 
studying at school for his 'O' levels. He owns an Atari 
800 with disk drive and cassette 



Have YOU drawn any pictures using your Atari? Ji 
they &r£ in Micropainter format or use the Atari Touch 
Tablet please send them in for inclusion in future 
SCREENDUMP* 





Magical Electronic frcrbites 
ATARI 810 DISK DRIVE 

AUTOTECT 
MODIFICATION 

CONSISTS OF A SMALL CIRCUIT 
BOARD AND A SMALL BOX. IT IS 
EASILY FITTED AND DOES NOT 
REQUIRE SOLDERING. WHEN FITTED 
IT FEATURES THE FOLLOWING 

1. WRITE TO SIDE B OF A DISK 
WITHOUT CUTTING NOTCHES. 
2 PROVIDES WRITE PROTECT 
WITHOUT PROTECT LABELS. 

3. QUIETENS DRIVE DOWN. 

4. FEATURES FLASHING RED/ 
CONSTANT GREEN PROTECT/ 
UNPROTECT INDICATOR- 
SUPPLIED COMPLETE WITH EASY TO 
FOLLOW FITTING DETAILS 

£17 inclusive of p&p. 



1 



SPEECH SYNTHESISER 

THIS UNIT CONSISTS OF A BOX 
WHICH PLUGS INTO THE JOYSTICK 
PORTS. IT HAS THE FOLLOWING 
FEATURES. 

1. BUILT IN SPEAKER 

2. ALLOPHONE SYNTHESIS. 
THIS MEANS THAT IT HAS AN 
UNLIMITED VOCABULARY. 

3. DOES NOT BLANK SCREEN. 

THE UNIT IS SUPPLIED COMPLETE 
WITH A WORD CONSTRUCTION 
PROGRAM AND SOME DEMOS. A 
COMPREHENSIVE MANUAL IS 
ALSO SUPPLIED. 

PLEASE STATE WHETHER 400/800 
OR XL ALSO DISC OR TAPE. 

£33 inclusive. 

Send large s,a.e. for details of the above and other 

items, 

Magical Electronic Services, 14 Durham Close, 
Little Lever. Bolton BL3 1 XA 




Flo Channel 8 Software, 

| 51, Fishergate, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 8 BH 

PlutB »nd n» ih» following My^eriou-s Adventum. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

| ADDRESS. 
I 



THE GOLDEN BATQN | ; PERSEUS K ANDROMEDA "' 

TH E TIME MACHINE G ESCAPE F ROM PULS A R 7 

CIRCUS □ FEASIBILITY EXPERIMENT^ 

AFlHaW OF DEATH PART 1J 10 LITTLE INDIANS D 

ABRDWOF DEATH PAftT 2D WAXWDFKS D 

THE WIZARD OF AKYRZ Ll 

AMOUNT 
TOTAL GAMES 9fGJS ENCLOSED £ „„.„.. 

Cish, Chwjue, P.O. enclosed oi Atccu/Bircdy Cird. 

F orward To: ■ K „ 



NAME.... 



aa^sg ^ <** *^-s; jess -s s * 



ai risnergaw^ rrest 
Lanes PR! 8BH. 
T*l: (0772) B30B7 



i SsOFTUUflRE 



W/J 



Select ad title* available frnm larger branches of 
Greens at Debcnharm. Lewii'i, Spectrum dealer* and* 
good computer shops everywhere, On esse of difficulty send P.O. or Cheque direct). 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



31 



Review 



Victagraph Plot Window 



Reviewed by Les Ellingham 



Back in issue 2 we reviewed the Victagraph Plot 
Window, a design aid for creating graphics on your Atari 
computer. The Victagraph has now been revised to 
include a comprehensive manual with a large section 
devoted to the 1020 printer/plotter and in view of the 
popularity of this printer I thought it was about time we 
had another look at the Victagraph. 

The Plot Window itself remains unchanged. To re-cap, 
it consists of four sheets of plastic measuring 17" x 12". 
One is a white base sheet two are see-through sheets 
with scales of 320 horizontally by 200 vertically and the 
final sheet is a clear mask with sights at each corner which 
enable you to plot and read off points. Quite complex 
designs can be copied as the accompanying illustration 
shows. The scales are ideally suited to Graphics 8 
although other modes can be used with either a smaller 
drawing or by scaling down. Good quality materials are 
used throughout and the Victagraph remains an inex- 
pensive way to put quality graphics on the screen. 

The new addition is a 46 page A4 size manual which 
will appeal especially to owners of the 1020 printer/ 
plotter Although concerned with the use of the Victagraph 
the manual is an excellent introduction to graphics in 
general using many illustrative programs and most of the 
latter half relates directly to the 1020. Most of the design 
of the manual, including the cover, illustrations, headings 
and listings have been done with the 1020. showing just 
h ow ve rsati le the machine i s. Th e mai n text is typed with a 
good quality typewriter but this does not detract from the 
content of the manual 

All different sorts of graphics design are covered 
including comprehensive detail on the use of the little 
documented XI O FILL Graphics modes to 1 1 are fully 
explained with the colours available, resolutions etc. and 
demo programs are included for each, Other chapters 
cover the drawing of circles, grids and different kinds of 
fill. The section dealing specifically with the 1020 covers 
text and graphics modes and explains cartesian and 















(T^F^yf^Q^lW 






ML 




\ 









Skeksis by David Eaton using the Victagraph Plot 
Window. 



iftW^riftfWtTSiittt it fffltsrrti 




An inexpensive aid to designing graphics 

relative co-ordinate systems to enable full use to be made 
of the printer. There follows a set of programs to enable 
easy placing of text, enhanced text, circle text (very 
impressive?) and rotated text in the graphics mode of the 
printer. It also includes three design aid programs making 
it possible to mix text and graphics as desired, 

If you are at all interested in graphics design on your 
computer, the Victagraph will provide an inexpensive aid 
to creating complex designs. If you have a 1020 printer/ 
plotter, it may be worth the price just for the manual for 
there is precious litt le i n Atari 1 s own ma n u a I to e n abl e y ou 
to use the printer to the full. 

The Victagraph Plot Window retails at£l 1 75 and can 
be obtained by your local dealer from Hi-Tech Distribution 
Ltd. Further enquiries may be made directly to the 
manufacturers, Vic tagrap hies. 7. Speechley Drive. 
Rugeley, Staffs. TeL 08894 78280. » 



9 REM MMMMMKMKMWXMKMMWMMWMMMXMWMMKXKM 

1 REN * SIMPLE SYNTHESISER * 

2 REM * BY LES ELLINGHAM * 

3 REM MK M KWMM«Sm « tt)CWH X * **« tt»mXMMMMm<)( 

6 REM PRESS ANY KEYS - TRY CUBMZ 

7 REM PRESS START OR SELECT TO ALTER 

PITCH OR HOLD OPTION 
10 POKE 53762,206 :PDKE 53761,160 
20 POKE 53775,255 
30 POKE 5376 8,1 

40 IE PEEKC53Z73i=6 THEN POKE 53768 ,0 
45 IF PEEKC5327S)=5 THEN POKE 53768,1 
SO IF PEEKC764)=255 THEN 48 
60 POKE 53760, PEEK (7643 

70 FOR 1=15 TO 4 STEP -5 SPOKE 53761,16 
O+IJ NEXT I 

00 IF PEEK (53273 J =3 THEN 60 
100 POKE 764. 255; GOTO 40 



32 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Programming 



Player Missile Cjraphics ...a machine code routine 



Using Players to any extent from BASIC is complex and 
I have therefore come up with a routine that takes away all 
the fuss and allows a shape to be placed anywhere on the 
screen with ease. I have also incorporated a routine that 
allows different frames' to be used to achieve animation 
and I hope that readers will find this program of use in 
their own games. 

The program uses machine code residing in page 6 of 
memory but allows horizontal and vertical movement to 
be controlled easily and rapidly from BASIC. There is also 
the facility for animation sequences up to 48 frames long 
The machine code routine used is tied to the Vertical 
Blank Interrupt system to allow smooth movement. 

The accompanying program demonstrates what is 
possible with the aid of a Sham us type character. Lines 
1000 to 1080 hold the data for the machine code and 
I ines 1 00 to 1 55 hold the data for th e f ram es req u ire d. It is 
a good idea to save the program before you attempt to 
run it as any errors in the data statements could cause the 
system to crash. If you have a 16Ksystem, the 144 in line 
10 should be changed to 48. 

To initialise the routine, the following BASIC command is 
used at the beginning of the program 



Figure 1 



Player 3 



Player 2 



Player 1 



Player 



Missiles 



NOT USED 



+2048 



+1792 



+ 1536 



+ 1280 



+ 1024 



+768 



PMSTART256 



A=USR(1536,PMSTART) 

PM START is the page number of the beginning of the 
player/missile table and would normally be above the 
display memory. 

Each frame is defined on a grid of 16 rows of 8 columns 
in a similar manner to the way characters are defined and 
up to 48 different patterns may be stored, The memory 
map for single line resolution players is normally as figure 
1. 

The program makes use of the unused 768 bytes to 
store the data for each frame. Thus frame occupies 
PMSTART256 to PMSTART* 256+1 5, frame 1 occupies 
PMSTART*256 + 16 to PMSTART256+31, frame 2 
occupies PMSTART*256+32 to PMSTART 25 6 +47 
and so on, 

Players are placed on the screen by the following 
command 

A=USR(1568,P>CY,F) 

the variables used are shown In figure 2. 

Each player can access any frame, regardless of 
whether it is being used by another. The horizontal and 
vertical co-ordinates refer to the top left hand corner of 
the player, so to center it around point X, Y, the values X- 
4,Y-8 would have to be substituted into the USR call. 
Animation may be achieved simply by modifying the X Y 
and P values and repeatedly calling the routine. 

To incorporate the routine into you own programs, just 
omit lines from 100 to 999 and continue programming as 
usual. 



Figure 2. 



P = player no. 0-3 

X — horizontal position 0-255 (0 = left hand 

side) 

Y = vertical position 0-240 (0=top) 

F = frame number 0-47 



PLOVER ANIMATOR 



FOR PAGE 



BV A.HUGNE5 



5 REM 

6 REM 

7 REM 

8 REM 

10 POKE 106,144: GRAPHICS : POKE 710,0 

20 PMSTART=PEEK(1061 :F"PMSTART*256 

25 REM IHfflBBB 

30 RESTORE 1000: FOR 0=1536 TO 1758 :REA 

D D:P0KE n,0:NEHT 

35 REM mmU'M'UZW 

40 POKE 55?,62:P0KE 54279, PMSTART : FOR 

0=8 TO 3: POKE 53248+0 J B:HEHT Q:POKE 70 

4 F S:PQKE 705,8rP0KE 706,12 

45 REM UTliliaflT 

50 POKE 53277,3:? "PLEA5E HAIT" 

55 REM HiMIMim 

60 H=U5RC1536, PMSTART) 

100 DATA 0,32,56,56,254,128,0,0,8,0,0, 

0,0,8,0,0 

110 DATA 8,0,0,8,0,60,54*60,8,2,0,0,2, 

68,32, 

115 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,16,20,16,40,4 

0,0,8,0 



PAGE 6- Issue 13 



33 



by Anthony Hughes 

120 DATA 32,56,56,254,128,0,0,0.0,0,0, 

125 DATA 0,0,0,0,60,54,60,0,2,0,0,0,9, 
0,28,0 

126 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,16,20,16,16,16, 
16,16,0,0 

130 DATA 0,32,56,184,254,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 
, f 0,0,0 

135 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,56,2,0,128,0, 
12,96,0 

140 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,124,124,124,0,16,12 
4,16,56,32,0,0 

145 DATA 0,32,56,184,254,8,0,0,0,0,0,0 
,0,0,0,0 

150 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,56,128,0,2,0, 
90,12,0 

155 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,124,124,124,0,16,12 
4,16,56,8,0,0 

160 RESTORE 100: FOR Q-0 TO 191: READ D : 
POKE F + Q,I>:NEHT 

165 rem KM!i »<:»■■ J n*^ 

170 FOR 0-0 TO 110 5TEP 2 
180 A=U5R 11568, 0,50,0,0) : A=U5« 11568 , 1, 
50, 220-0 , 1 J J A=USR U568, 2 , 160-Q , 110 , 2) 
190 SOUND 0,0+20, 10, 10 iSOUNO 1,0+21,10 
, 10:HEXT 
195 50UHD 1,0,0,0 
200 REH HH ■ Slil rliMa H I a J^ 
210 H=0 

220 FOR X-50 TO 150 

230 A=U5R C1568 , , X , 110 , HI : A=USR £1568 , 1 
, M , 110 , N+l> : A=U5R (1568, 2 , K, 110 , N+2 ) 
235 SOUND 0,M*1O+18O,2,10 
240 H=N+3;1F N>5 THEN N-G 
250 FOR 0=0 TO 8:HEHT D ! 50UND 0,0,0,0 
260 NEXT X 

300 REM l"r!H«HJMiM4J:i 
310 H=6 

320 FOR V=HO TO 1 STEP ^1 
330 A=USR(156e,0,15G,Y,N> : A=USRC1568, 1 
, ISO, V , N+13 ; A=USR (1568,2, 150, Y , N+2 J 
340 N=H+3!XF N=12 THEN N=6 
350 SOUND 0,10*N+140,2,10;FOR 0=0 TO 8 
-.NEXT D: SOUND 0,0,0,0 
360 NEXT V 
370 GOTO 170 

1000 DATA 164,104,104,141,218,6,24,105 
,4,141, 219, 6 , 169 , , 162 ,3,157,200 , 6 , 202 
,16,250,169,7,162 

1010 DATA 6,160,67,32,92,228,96,169,1, 
141,220,6,104,104,104,170,104,104,157, 
208,6,104,104,157,212 

1020 DATA 6,104,104,157,204,6,169,1,15 
7,200,6,169,0,141,220,6,96,173,220,6,2 
40,3,76,98,228 



1030 DATA 162,3,189,200,6,208,6,202,16 
, 240,76 , 90 , 228 ,142,216,6, 169 ,0,157,200 
,6,141,221,6,189 

1040 DATA 204,6,201,16,16,21,189,204,6 
, 10,10 ,10,10, 133,205 , 173 , 221 , 6 , 24 , 109 , 
218,6,133,206,76 

1050 DATA 152,6, 173,221,6, 24, 10S, 1,141 
, 221 , 6 , 189 , 204 ,6,56, 233 ,16,157,204,6,2 
01,16,40,213,76 

1060 DATA 127,6,173,219,6,24,109,216,6 
,133,204,169,0,133,203,160,255,145,203 
,136,200,251,109,212,6 

1070 DATA 133,203,160,0,177,205,145,20 
3,200,192,16,200,247,174,216,6,189,208 

,6,157,0,200,24,144,131 

1080 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

1090 DATA 192,208,224,240,0,0,0,0,0,0, 





Review 

ATARI GAMES and RECREATIONS 

by H, Kohl TKhan et al. 

Published by Reston Publishing Co. 

Price £12.50 



Basically, this book is a revamped version of the Atari 
Basic Manual' but presented in a simplified form with 
cartoons and footnotes. It is aimed at the absolute 
beginner who may be bored by examples in 'Atari Basic 
and who wants to put some concepts to use in games. 

The idea is a good one in that a concept for example 
random numbers, is introduced and a program built up 
from two or three lines into a full-blown program. In 
Chapter 2, PLOT and DRAWTO are used with loops and 
RND numbers to produce a bogglingly boring program in 
which one half of the screen is filled methodically with 
squares while the other half PLOTs and DRAWTOs at 
random The idea is to guess which screen will fill first. Not 
particularly impressive! 

In the same way. graphics, strings, sound and colour 
are dealt with. A few subroutines are given on timing and 
score-keeping together with some sound routines for 
rocket lift-off. explosions, sirens etc 

This is a fair book for youngsters starting out because a 
program; of sorts, can be entered and run quite quickly 
but whilst being a fair attempt to introduce the basics in a 
palatable way, I feel that it does not give enough value for 
its price. 

Review by C.L. Jones 



34 



PAGES - Issue 13 



Games 



BULL ANTS 



Bull Ants is basically a two player game although it can 
be played by one person. 

You and your friend are ants and you have lived 
happily in your nest for a long time but now the cons- 
truction workers have moved into the neighbourhood 
and are using explosives to dig trenches for foundations 
of a new shopping centre Another problem are the bull 
ants which have moved into your nest because their 
home was destroyed in the first phase of construction. 

Use joysticks 1 & 2 to control the red and green ants. 
You must move your five eggs from the bottom of the nest 
to safety at the top of the screen. On the way up you must 
watch out for cave- ins and the bull ants. 

If you are hit by a cave-in* you will be sent to the top of 
the screen. If you aTe stung by a bull ant you will be 
paralysed and will have to wait for the next explosion to 
shock you out of it. In either case, if you were carrying an 
egg, you will lose it and it will be represented by a black 
egg appearing at the top of the screen on your side. 

The winner is the one who gets the most eggs to the top 
safely. If both players get the same number, the winner 
will be the first to get them there. 

REH tt M M MltKMUMMWKKXMMKMMltMMMMMHMMMHH 

1 REM * DULL ANTS * 

2 REH * BY SVDHEV BROUN * 

3 REM * * 

4 REH * First published in * 

5 REM * ACE NEWSLETTER, * 

6 REH * 3662, UIHE MAPLE DRIVE » 
? REH* EUGENE, OREGON,' tl . S, ft . * 

8 REH *MWMHMWMXXXM*KMMKHMMtt* * **** * *** 

9 REH 

IP ? ,I * ,, :5P=1:G0SUB 2800 

200 5T=STICKC0) :P0KE 53278, :A1=A1+SP : 

IF 01 > 215 THEN ftl=10 

Z01 IF G0T1=1 THEN 20? 

202 POKE 53250, ftl:IF ST=14 AND Mi>0 TH 
EN LOCATE Hl,VIi,Z:IF Z=32 THEN COLOR 

32! PLOT H1 F V1:U1=1>1-U«0T0 209 

203 IF ST=13 AND Vl<22 THEN LOCATE HI, 
UI+i,Z:IF Z=32 THEN COLOR 32! PLOT H1,V 
1:V1=U1+1:G0T0 203 

205 IF ST=11 AND H1>0 THEN LOCATE HI-I 
,V1,Z;IF Z=32 THEN COLOR 32: PLOT Hl,Ul 
:Hl_Hl-i :G0TO 20? 

207 IF ST = 7 AND H1<1? THEN LOCATE Hl+1 
,Ut,Z:lF Z-32 THEH COLOR 32:PL0T HI, 01 
:H1-H1+I :G0T0 289 

20? COLOR 247:PL0T Hl,Ml!lF Vl=2 OR 01 
=22 THEN GOSUB 300 

210 5T=5TICKUJ :A2=A2-5P:IF A2<10 THEN 
02=200 

211 IF G0T2=I THEN 219 

212 POKE 53251, A2: IF ST=14 AND V2>0 TH 
EH LOCATE H2,U2-1,Z:IF Z=32 THEN COLOR 



by Sydney Brown 



32: PLOT H2,U2:V2=V2-i;G0T0 21? 
213 IF 5T=13 AND V2<22 THEN LOCATE H2, 
U2+1,Z IF Z=32 THEN COLOR 32: PLOT H2,V 
2:U2=U2+liG0TO 21? 

215 IF 5T-11 AND H2>0 THEH LOCATE H2~l 
,V2,Z:IF Z-32 THEN COLOR 32: PLOT H2,U2 
:H2-H2 1:CGT0 21? 

217 IF 5T=7 AND H2<1? THEH LOCATE H2+1 
,V2,ZlIF Z=32 THEN COLOR 32: PLOT H2,U2 
:H2=H2+l:GOT0 21? 

21? COLOR 216:PL0T H2,V2:IF V2=2 OR V2 
=22 THEH G05UB 310 

240 A1=AI+SP:IF Al>2l5 THEN Al=10 
242 A2=A2-5P!IF A2<10 THEH 02=200 
244 POKE 53250, Ai : POKE 53251, A2 
250 IF PEEK (53254) <>0 OR PEEK (53255) <> 
THEH GOSUB 500 

276 IF EG15 AHD EG2=5 THEN 600 
276 IF PEEKC53279)=6 THEH 0?? 
27? IF PEEK (53279) =5 THEN GOSUB 10000; 
POSITION 9,0;? tt6;"S";5Pj 
230 RK=RH+1:IF RH<160 THEN 200 

281 SOUND 0,4?, 0,15: FOR M~l TO 21: POKE 
DL ,123: FOR MH=1 TO 2:HEXT MM: POKE DL , 

24O:F0R MW= I TO, 2:NENT MH:HEXT H 

282 FOR H=0 TO 5: COLOR 32:PL0T HY(Q,H) 
, XV CI , H) : KV CO f HI =INT C20*RND CO) ) : LOCATE 

HY(0,H) ,HY(1,M) ,Z 
203 SOUND 8,49,8,15-14*3: FDR HH=1 TO 10 
SNEHT HH: COLOR 95: PLOT HY CO , U) f XV (1 , H) 
:IF Z<>32 THEN GOSUB 400 

2S5 HEXT M:GDT1=0:GOT2=0: SOUND 0, 255,0 
,4 

29? POKE 77,0:RM=IHTC150*RHDC0)) I GOTO 
200 

300 IF El=l THEH 320 

302 LOCATE Hl f Vl+l,Z:lF Z<>122 OR H1>1 
4 THEH RETURN 

305 GOSUB 350 :E1=1:M1=H1+1: COLOR 32: PL 
OT H1,V1+1:IF Hl=5 AMD FF=0 THEN FF=1 

309 RETURH 

310 IF E2=l THEN 330 

312 LOCATE H2,U2+1,Z:IF Z<>122 OR H2<1 
4 THEN RETURH 

315 GOSUB 360:E2=1:H2=N2+1:COL0R 32 : PL 
OT H2, 02+1! IF N2=5 AND FF=0 THEN FF=2 

319 RETURH 

320 IF Ul>2 THEH RETURN 

325 GOSUB 350: COLOR 250: PLOT Ml -1,0: El 
=;0:Sl=Sl+ltEGl=EGl*l:IF Sl=5 THEN POP 
SGOTO 600 

329 RETURH 

330 IF U2>2 THEH RETURN 

335 GOSUB 360 t COLOR 216! PLOT 20~N2,8:E 
2=0!S2=52+1!EG2=EG2+1!IF 552-5 THEH PO 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



35 





fl] ^B » *§r |*" s b 

"■■fit ^^cb%bc& r * ,< 






*H> W '™ ™ 


« II 


>^^B- 


*„« HIUIMIP 


b HhmiiUHmm 


















• * ■» m <; cb §- 


•pcci « «* <• 9 



p -.goto 688 

33? RETURN 

350 FOR W=15 TO 8 STEP "I: SOUND 0,14,1 
0,H:NEXT H: SOUND 0, 255 , 0, 4 : RETURN 
360 FOR H=15 TO STEP -1 : SOUND 0,10,1 
8.H:NEHT M: SOUND , 255 , , 4 : RETURN 
400 FOR HZ=258 TO 5 STEP ~7: SOUND 8, HZ 
,2,14:MEXT HZ:50UND 8,255,8,6:IF Z=216 
THEN 450 
405 H1=9:V1=2:C0L0R 247:PL0T HI, 111 
410 IF £1=0 THEN RETURN 
415 Ei-0: COLOR 122: PLOT Nl l P fl :EG1=EG1 
+1 

449 RETURN 

450 H2=10:V2=2 : COLOR 216: PLOT K2,U2 
460 IF £2=0 THEN RETURN 

465 E2 = 0; COLOR 122 5 PLOT 20-N2 , : EG2=EG 
2+1 

499 RETURN 

500 IF (PEEK (53254) =4 OR PEEK (532551 =4 
1 AND GOT2=8 THEN GOSUB 460: G0T2=i : GOT 

510 

502 IF {PEEK (532541=8 OR PEEK (532551 =8 

1 AND GOT1=0 THEN GOSUB 410 i G0T1=1 i GOT 
510 

504 IF (PEEK (53254? =12 OR PEEK (532551= 
12) AND (GOTlzO OR GOT2=0) THEN GOSUB 
410:G05UB 460 :G.0Tl=l:G0T2=li GOTO 510 

503 GOTO 549 

510 FOR H=30 TO STEP -l: SOUND 0,7,6, 

h/2:nekt m:sound 0,255,0,4 

549 POKE 53278, 0:RETURN 

600 IE 51=52 THEN HIN=FF:G0T0 650 

610 IF 51>S2 THEN HIN=1 

628 If 52)51 THEN HIN=2 

650 SOUND 8,0,0,8: IF WIN 1 THEN 698 

660 position 8,23:? »6 ; " AAAAAA the AA en<* 

aaaaaaii; ;FDR H=l TO 108: NEXT M:IF PEEK 
(53279) =6 THEN 639 



665 POSITION 8, 23 J? tt6 j "aaaaaaamaaaaa 

AHJH23"*; :F0R H=l TO 100: NEXT H:IF PEEK 

(532733=6 THEN 699 

668 GOTO 666 

698 POSITION 0,23:? |J6;''AAAAAAtheA^nd 

AAAAAAii; ;F0|} ifci tO 100 1 NEXT HMF PEEK 

(532791=6 THEN 699 

635 POSITION 8,23:? tt6 ; ,, HlHn3 AAAAAAAAA 



(532791=6 THEN 699 
698 GOTO 690 

693 GOSUB 3i9l;G0Tl=8?G0T2=8:GQT0 288 
1008 DATA 12,2,181,254,252,04,82,137,4 
0,64,166,127,63,42,74,145,42,42,62,62, 
62,28,23,8,12,30,62,62,30,12,0,0 
1010 DATA 9,11,75,187,116,104,56,8,1,3 
,7,15,23,63,35,255,128,192,160 
1028 DATA 248,240,252,222,255,251,255, 
131,255,253,255,223,255,0,8,0,0,52,126 

,191,255 

2088 DIN P5(46) , C5(5Q),XV(1,51 ;C$="+*Q 
A fl*C) A, »+^¥+^* t ^7-* hk ¥E7-'*f *fflN *»_£]X *- 
+*****" 

2082 PS='H^H^Hffiva^£N^Hh 1«BH I 33331 
GEPi /hDhwh8¥h HHi " : P=ADR (PS ) : PH=INT (P/ 
256) :PL=(P-Plf*256):C=ADR(C$) 
2005 CH=INTCC/256) : CL= CC-CH«256) :PS(21 
)=CHRS(CL) :PS(22)=CHR$(CH1 :KH IHT((PH 
11/256J :HL=CP+4t)-(XK*256) 
2018 PS(161=CHR$CXL) : PS (17)=CHRS (XH) :P 
S(33)=CNR$(XL) 1 P$ (341 =CHR$(XH) : POKE 51 
2, PL I POKE 513, PH 

2180 FOR H=8 TO 5;XY(6,H)=0:NEHT H;XY( 
1 , 0> = 6 : XV (1 , 1) =8 i XV (1 , 2) = 12 : XV (1 , 3) =14 
: XV (1 , 4) =10 : XV (1 ,51=28 

2288 CB=PEEK£1G6)-8:P0KE 106, CB: POKE 5 
4279, CO: GRAPHICS 17 ; POKE 712 , 134 : A=PEE 
K(1B6)*256:P0KE 768,30 

3880 POSITION 0,8:? »6;" AAA a a a 
A "«? 86j" A a a a a a";^ tt6;" AA 

AA A A A A" 

3001 ? 86j" A A A A A A ":? tt6; ,,A 

A A A A A 1 ' ; V |t6 ; "AAAAA AAAA AAAA 

AAA A" 

3002 ? 86 i? 86:? 116;" AA A A AAA 
AA "J? 86;" A A aa a A ";? 86;" A 

A AAA A A" 

3083 ? 86;" aaaaaa a aaa A ":? tt6;" A 

A A AA A";? 86;" A AAA 

A " :P0KE 711, 92; POKE 703,204 
3005 POKE 756, CB: POSITION 4,21!? 86! "5 
ETTIHG UP" 
3181 F8R B=8 TO 511: IF B>439 THEN READ 

D:P0KE A+B,D:HEXT B:G0T0 3118 

con fin tied on page 44 



36 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



Review 



Music Maestro Please 



Playing music on a computer is no substitute to learning 
or playing an instrument but computer music can be fun 
and, if you find the right program, can be educational, 1 
will take a look here at two of the lesser known music 
programs for the Atari POKEY PLAYER is more suited to 

the user who just wants to add some music to his 
programs without learning too much about music whilst 
ADVANCED MUSIC SYSTEM II will also cater for the 
more serious music enthusiast. 

POKEY PLAYER; The program is named after the [C in 
Atari computers which generates sound and enables the 
user to program the computer to play music using three 
'voices 1 . The documentation is quite comprehensive, and 
certainly adequate insofar as using the facilities of the 
program are: concerned. One needs to know some basics 
about written music to be able to program a computer to 
play it however l user- friendly 1 the program is, and the 
documentation with POKEY PI AYER attempts to intro- 
duce music to a beginner in the subject. It does a fair job 
with respect to the program. From a purely musical point 
of view however, it is full of mistakes and misleading 
suggestions at least with regard to accepted musical 
education in England. I don't know if there is a different 
system i n the U S. A but I wou Id d oubt it. So, if yo u are n ew 
to music, take POKEY PLAYERs documentation as a 
rough guide only to music theory. 

The disk contains a full directory of data, mostly 
demonstration tunes, but also an Editor, Compiler. Merge 
program and a Player, Three of these are BASIC pro- 
grams, the Compiler is a binary file. There is also another 
program for advanced users. 

Booting up the disk with BASIC installed loads and 
runs me Player, listing all the tunes available and asking 
for ones choice. There is a wide selection of styles, 
classical or modern, which show off the capabilities of the 
program and the computer. Some of the lively tunes and 
the baroque style of Bach and Handel come across very 
well, but the slower melodies tend to emphasise the raw 
square wave sound used by the computer. 

Now, what about typing in some music? One enters the 
Editor program. This is a very clever program, using a 
custom display list redefined characters and Player 
Missile Graphics. The perfect choice of colours and 
graphic detail give this a totally professional feel and the 
use of the joystick to enter notes is convenient and very 
easy to I earn H avi n g the notes displ ay ed on bass or trebl e 
staves, on a graphic keyboard and by name is very helpful 
to ensure that the correct note goes in. 1 found it quick to 
enter notes straight off of sheet music but there is a 
problem in checking the entry as there is no facility to 
listen to the notes just entered. One hears the pitches as 
they are stored but not in succession or time. The joystick 
i s mo ve d up or d o w n to se le ct a para meter- rests, pitc h es, 
note values or ties and from side to side to raise or lower 



the value of a note. Pressing the joystick button enters a 
note. The keyboard is also used to delete/ insert, load/ 
save, label and move measures and set tempo and sound 
quality, 

Hound the error checking and editing of entered tunes 
a major drawback with the program. One has to enter 
three voices before the program can play a tune, even if it 
means entering nothing but rests! (An easy way around 
this is to save the first tune as. VI, duplicate this twice 
using DOS and rename the additional two files using. V2 
and V3 Ed.) If the tune is playing too slowly for example, 
one has to reload the Editor program, then reload each of 
the three voices in turn, adjust the tempo on each and 
then save all three again Next reload the Compiler {from 
DO S) an d com pi le th e three voi ces into o n e f th en loa d th e 

Player to hear the tune again, ff it is still not right well 

you need patience! The editing of in correct notes/ tempos 
is so involved as to be an unacceptable time consumer for 
me and I suspect will be an aggravation to other users. 

To end on a positive note, the music files are very 
compact, shown by a full disk directory but not a full disk, 
so if an application requires compact music files then one 
will have to perfect the art of entering music note by note 
without mistakes! There are 50 tunes on the disk so even 
if you do find entering, your own tunes difficult there is 
plenty to listen to! 

Editors note: One of the biggest advantages of POKEY 
FLAYER, not covered in the manual, is that the tunes can be 
added very easily to your own BASIC programs and played 
whilst the program is busv doing other things. In a later i&sue / 
hope to present a program that will allow you to take any of the 
tunes from the disk and add ihem to your own programs to be 
played whilst your program is running. 

ADVANCED MUSIC SYSTEM II: The documentation 
begins ll lt is oriented towards those familiar with music 
notation and basic musical terms 1 . There is no instruction 
on how to read music but there are plenty of books 
available for the beginner in music I think it is much better 
to get a book specifically to learn music theory and then 
tackle music programming. If you are interested enough 
to want to use your Atari as a player, you will probably 
have a desire to leam about the theory of music or will 
have a basic knowledge from school. 

Although this is an advanced music system, the ins- 
tructions are very clear in showing one how to use the 
program, giving plenty of examples, The system handles 
4 voices overS 1 /^ octaves and is so efficient that it can play 
as fast as 2100 notes a second] Envelope control gives 3 
levels of note decay, one can change the speed using a 
joystick while the music is playing recording sync is 
provided for multi- tracking and the editor is fantastic! The 
system supports key signature, time signature {up to 32/ 
32!), whole notes through to 64th notes (semibreve to 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



37 



two music programs reviewed by Phil Brown 



hemidemisemiquaver!) and odd note durations such as 
double dotted notes, triplets, septuples and beyond. The 
editor performs musical syntax 1 check on note entry and, 
importantly, on whole measure (bar) entry. As soon as 
you have entered any notes you can press P to hear what 
they sound like, at whatever speed you choose. A very 
helpful feature when the notes are fresh in mind. 

The program is autoboot disk, also available on 
cassette, written in machine language with several derno 
pieces, all well known classical pieces, each showing off a 
different capability, from Flight of the Bumblebee through 
Bachs Toccata & Fugue in D Minor to a Chopin Piano 
piece. As each piece of music is played there is a bVz 
octave keyboard on the screen and one can see all the 
notes moving highlighted by a different colour for each 
voice - very impressive. 

After booting the disk, the user is presented with a 
menu of functions available, including DOS functions. 
The most important is the Editor, Choice of this presents 
another screen where music can be typed in and edited. 
All entry is via the keyboard and it took me a while to get 
used to this, especially the American terms for notes such 
as ha If note, quartern ote, eighth note meaning, respec- 
tively, a minim, crotchet and quaver. It would probably 
help to draw a diagram of all notes with their English and 
American equivalents if you felt at all unsure. Also, since 
the octave of the pitch has to be specified by a number (1- 
6), it would help to draw up a diagram showing bass and 
treble clefts and the places where the octaves change 
number. There is a prompt at the bottom of the screen to 
remind one of the note entry format which is NOTE / 
OCTAVE / DURATION / ENVELOPE / VOLUME 

These parameters all remain constant except the 
NOTE, so if the music has several notes of the same 
length, you only have to type the note letter (A - G). 
Facilities are there to repeat notes and phrases and delete 
notes or whole bars. 1 found it slow going at first thinking 
of note names and values, then typing each one in, but 
after 2 or 3 sessions I became quicker and the last piece I 
typed in (one of Bachs Gavottes for 2 voices) took only 
two hours from start to finish - and that was on my 40(3 
using my two finger typing technique! 

It is very good practice using this program to enter 
music because it makes one follow correct musical 
convention. For example, you are not allowed on to the 
next bar until the present one is full. Anyone studying for 
music theory exams will appreciate the possibilities, such 
as entering ornaments, which AMS II handles a treat. If 
you would like to hear a quintuplet of quavers played 
against 4 quavers, AMS II can do it! My fingers boggle at 
the screen watching Chopin's music being played! 



Whatever program one uses to play music on the Atari, 
the end result will depend on how well the programmer 
understands the composition of music, Altering the 
dyn am ics of each voic e an d the en ve lo pe of e ac h n ot e wi 11 
make a big difference to the final sound and an efficient 
editor is vital to allow one to experiment with different 
ideas. With AMS II it is so easy to alter the tempo with a 
joystick and so get the right feel of the piece, This can be 
done for any number of bars and any combination of 
uoiceS- 

SOME FINAL THOUGHTS As with all computer 
programs it is sometimes asked L1 What is the point of it?" 
or ''What use is it? 1 ' Apart from any amusement value, is 
t h ere any poi nt in playi n g m usi c on a co m pu ter wh en one 
can buy pre-recorded music? 

1 have already mentioned the educational value of 
AMS U and this could be very important to some 
individuals. The actual sound isn't very good and the Atari 
does not have perfect pitch. The Atari can only generate 
raw square waves with these programs and this tends to 
be a bit harsh and uninteresting, even through a good hi-fi 
system, although to be fair, the varying envelopes and 
dynamics available do help. 1 recently patched the output 
of the Atari through my electronic organ, adding reverb, 
rotating loudspeaker, wah-wah etc. and the results were 
encouraging. There are interesting possibilities here. The 
ultimate would be to interface the Atari with the keyboard 
contacts so it could play the organ. This is done with other 
computers (eg the MIDI interface) so it must be possible 
with the Atari. 

One can use music programs to generate parts of 
scores to play along with. This is a good discipline as Atari 
keeps perfect time and I can recommend this as a 
practical use. 

One can type in difficult phrases to hear how they 
should sound. Music purists may not approve but I find it 
very helpful especially with some parts of Bachs music. 

As a church organist I can look forward to the future 
with some trepidation and see my replacement being an 
Atari with a disk full of hymns, a disk of wedding music 
and a disk of funeral mutsc with the Minister having a 
joystick in the tectum to increase the speed on cold 
days! 

POKEY PLAYER is available from PAGE 6 price £6 95 
and requires a 48 k disk system, 

ADVANCED MUSIC SYSTEM If is available from 
LOTSABYTES, 15445 Ventura Blvd., Suite JOG 
Sherman Oaks, CA 91413. USA price $14.95 plus 
15% shipping. • 



38 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



High Quality- Low Con 

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Letteftief shire Tete 105331863310 



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MATHS It GEOMETRY 

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GEOGRAQUIZ 1 Gf mm Britain *nd fc*4and towrni and citiei 

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MtSTORV MAKERS deduce me famout p*«ori from Ih* clues 



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There's a lot to learn I 

AH a*mri t'W titLiblc an CBHI» only enfl r#fluir» UK Him md BASIC c»rtr>dp, 
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SUPERSOFT 



powerful utility 



THE CREATOR* 

which will design up to 99 images in one load, 
which can then be downloaded and saved in your 
own BASIC programs. 

TDK Tape £10 
Memorex Disk £15 

THE HELPER Stack on an 

Adventure? Frustrated with all the witches, 
dragons, w izard s a n d m agic spe I Is a gai nst y o u? N o 
wonder you need HELP and THE HELPER gives it 
to you. THE HELPER will list the program to 
screen and allow you to search for clues. In fact it is 
an extra adventure all by itself. 

TDK cassette £10 

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seperate pinball games on a double sided 
Memorex disk ..... ONLY £15 

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CONTACT 



WANTED: ANALOG issues 1 - 7, 10 & 16, ANTIC 
Vol! issues 1-4, Best prices paid or I have copies of 
ANTIC (V.2, 6 t 7 & 1 1) and ANALOG 18 to swap. Also 
I will buy any faulty Atari equipment (not VCS or 
controllers). Finally I would like to meet any other users 
in the Watford area. Please contact Chris Bone, 10, 
Garston Drive, Watford, Herts, WD2 6LB, Tel. 
Garston 672235 

WELLINGTON USERS GROUP Anyone in the 
Wellington, Somerset area please contact Martin 
Rogers, 3, Wharf Cottages, Wellington, Somerset, 

TA21 0AJ 

PROGRAM TYPING: I just don't have the time to 
type all the programs I would like and wish to contact 
other users with the view of swapping magazine 
programs. Please contact John Marshall. 70, Manesty 
Cres.. Clifton Estate. Nottingham, NG1 1 9DU 

MACHINE LANGUAGE; Can anyone advise me 
how to PLOT and DRAWTO in Graphics 10 using 
machine language? Michael Courtney, 64 , First 
Avenue, Gillingham, Kent, ME7 2LG 

GHOST TOWN: How can I find the Silver Cup? To 
my shame I have been stuck on this for 9 months! Can 
anyone help? I have completed Ad ventur eland. 
Strange Odyssey amd Golden Baton and would be 
pleased to help others on these, Tom Gain ford, 15, 
Veryan Court, Park Road, Crouch End. London, N.8, 
Tel. 01340 0329 



MORE 

ARTICLES 
PLEASE! 



The number of articles we have available for future 
issues is now quite small H so how about having a go and 
writing an article for other Atari users to enjoy. Articles on 
any aspect of Atari computing are welcome. If there is an 
area of programming that interests you why not write an 
article about it? 

We try not to repeat previously published articles but if 
you can find a new variation or enhancement to an earlier 
article or program we would be pleased to hear from you. 
If you can come up with something that we have not 
covered, even better! 

Don't forget programs either. In fact anything that 
interests you is bound to be of interest to other readers 
Don't forget also that you may be the winner of next years 
Readers Poll! 



PACE 6 - issue 13 



39 



SUPER ATARI 




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40 



PAGE 6 - Issue 1 3 



oftware Reviews.... The Software Reviews.. ..The Softwar 



ALPHABET „„ 48k disk/ cassette „.. written by M. White .... 



Alphabet is a pre-reading program for the average four 
to five year old very similar to Atari's My First Alphabet bat 
written in this country and therefore without any 
problems of Americanisms'. The program was originaly 
accepted by Atari to be released in a line of home 
produced educational software but following the 
takeover. Atari decided not to publish it and it is now sold 
direct by the author. 

The program presents a series of pictures for the child 
with a caption such as 'a is for apple' and the letters of the 
alphabet underneath for the child to identify the correct 
letter with which the word begins or ends Generally the 
program is very good. There are one or two not so good 
po in t s b u t m ore o f those later Firstly lets look at the good 
points. 





« s f 





tt# »** i tfc t tmvmfmasitsumamc^am 



The manual is excellent It has been written in 
conjunction with a primary school teacher and, apart 
from explaining the program in detail, it contains a guide 
for you as a parent on how to use the program in 
conjunction with your child to get the most benefit, It 
makes it clear that learning with a computer requires 
active participation from both child and parent and 
proper encouragement whether the answers given are 
right or wrong. The program itself contains a picture for 
each letterof the alphabet with a corresponding word and 
a series of options for choosing a letter in that word. The 
order suggested by the authors is First letter of the word 
highlighted, last letter highlighted, either letter 
highlighted (at random), first letter normal (not 
distinguished from the rest of the word}, last letter normal, 
either letter normal, first letter missing, last letter missing 
Following this progression it becomes more and more 
difficult for the child but he/she should be able to tackle 



each level having learnt the last Further options allow the 
pictures to be presented alphabetically or at random, 
Prior to playing, the game can be put in an autorun mode 
to enable the child to get used to the program. 

When a picture is shown, the caption beneath will state, 
for example. s j is for jam* and the child must use the 
joystick to move an arrow above the letters of the 
alphabet to choose the letter j. If he is correct the 
background of the screen flashes and a rabbit on the left 
hand side will be redrawn closer to a carrot. Each correct 
answer will move the rabbit nearer until he reaches the 
carrot when a nursery rhyme will be played. If the letter 
chosen is wrong, the program will give the correct answer 
and move the pointer to the correct letter. 

The actual teaching side of the program has been well 
thought out and the pictures are very colourful. Graphics 
10 has been used for extra colours but this does tend to 
make many of the pictures somewhat blocky. What of the 
other niggles? The sound could, and should, be a lot 
better. As each picture is drawn it is accompanied by a 
monotonous single rising or falling tone that aggravates, 
at least to adults, after two or three times. The rabbit is 
redrawn each time, slowly whereas player missile 
graphics could have been used to add more interest and 
better movement. Getting out of a picture if the wrong 
one is chosen is by holding the option key but it is far too 
slow to react Finally the packaging is pretty basic to say 
the least, Whilst there is no need to go to Atari extremes of 
selling more box than program, I feel that better 
presentation would add greatly to peoples acceptance of 
the program. 

The educational value for the child cannot be faulted 
and it is on this that the program should finally be judged. 
Personally I prefer My First Alphabet but Alphabet is half 
the price and it is written in England It is also available on 
cassette whilst My First Alphabet is only on disk. 



Reviewed by Les EHingham 



PAGE 6- Issue 13 



41 



SOFTWARE 

EXPRESS 



C= 



31 STONEYHURST ROAD r ERDlNGTON, BIRMINGHAM 
TELEPHONE:- (021) 384 5080 



Dear Atari User 



If you think that SOFTWARE EXPRESS is Just another mail 
order company then you are WRONGGGGG ! ? * ! ! 

We have gathered together our own Atari 'A -TEAM' of experts, 
from within the computer industry, to provide you, the user, 
with the most comprehensive service available in the U.K. 



Our product knowledge and world-wide contacts enable us 
to obtain any Atari products . Our boast is simple: 

"IF ITS AVAILABLE ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD WE WILL GET IT". 



And that's NOT Just software, but hardware, printers, 
cables, modems, magnetic media, basically anything you care 
to name. 

You may also take out subscriptions to specialist magazines, 
we also supply individual copies (subject to availability) 

We haven't forgotten books either- there are many to chose 
from and we will be more than pleased to advise. 



Problems? We don't believe in them, we have an efficient 
technical back -up team able to assist you with any hardware 
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Mix all these ingredients together and you have a recipe 
for the most comprehensive service available for the gourmet 
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Now put us to the test.,. 

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MP 



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SOFTWARE EXPRESS 

P.S. After office hours Telephone (021) 773 2849 
P.P.S, We also operate a separate Commodore Service. 



TM ATARI INTERNATIONAL L.TQ. TW COMMODORE jCBMl LTD. 



42 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



views.. ..The Software Reviews.. ..The Software Reviews.. 



DONKEY KONG JR .... Atari .... 16k ROM .... 1/2 players .... 



This is the second part in what might be termed 'the 
exploits of Mario' In case you did not know the story 
began with Mario the Mad Carpenter rescuing his 
girlfriend, or trying to, from an even more mad gorilla 
called Kong. 

In the second part of this delightful tale, Mario 
completely flips his lid, kicks out his girlfriend and 
imprisons Kong in a cage. Fortunately for Kong, his little 
lad, Kong Junior, finds out what sadistic Mario has done 
and sets out to the rescue. Mario, having experienced 
Kong's defence system creates one of his own. Thus the 
scene is set for our intrepid hero Kong Junior. 

Mario's defences are very ape- oriented 1 with lots of 
ropes to climb and delicious fruit including, inevitably, 
bananas to grab. There are four different screens in all 
and they require practice to complete. 

The first screen requires Kong Junior to climb ropes 
and jump chimney pots while avoiding Mario's deadly 
pets, the Snapjaws! Looking rather like oversized 
crocodile clips these come in two varieties, purple and 
blue. Purple Snapjaws move up and down the ropes 
whilst the blue ones slide down the ropes very quickly and 
drop off the end. Both types can be destroyed by 
dropping fruit on them. Kong is chained up in his cage at 
the top of the screen and when Junior finally reaches htm, 



Mario pulls the cage out of reach off the screen. 

The second screen is totally different. Now Kong Junior 
has to push several keys up their ropes to the scaffolding 
at the top. He is hindered by the Snapjaws and a 
squadron of geese who flap across the screen at different 
heights trying to dislodge him. When all the keys have 
been pushed home there is a delightful animated scene of 
Kong Jr. rescuing his dad and Kong kicking Mario who 
goes spinning into the sky. 

All this fun is, however, short-lived for in screen three 
Kong is imprisoned again and Kong Junior has to climb 
ropes and ladders, travel across moving platforms and 
jump on a trampoline all while avoiding the geese who 
now drop eggs on him! 

It is beyond my power (and sanity!) to reach the fourth 
screen which apparently is the most difficult of all! As in 
Donkey Kong the screens are split up and run in the order 
1,2,1,3,2,4 and the game has one or two player options, 
choice of difficulty level and a freeze option. 

Donkey Kong Junior is the best of the series with good 
graphics ■ colourful, detailed and original ■ and with good 
sound. The game is highly addictive and the expression 
on Kong Junior's face when he gets killed just has to be 
seen! 



THE CREATOR .... Supersoft ... 48k disk/cassette .... 



The CREATOR is a player-missile graphics design aid 
and is very similar to Channel 8's The Constructor. In fact 
it is so similar it could be a prototype. 

A grid is presented on screen 22 bytes high by 8 wide 
on w h ic h po i nts c a n be pi otte d w tth t h e j oysti ck to form an 
image which the program then stores as a player. Several 
editing features are included but some are missing such as 
the ability to scroll the entire image left or right or up and 
down, Up to 99 images can be drawn and then put 
together in an animation sequence. When you are 
satisfied, these can be sawed to cassette or disk as either a 
file or a program in BAS1C. 

This type of program is intended to take the hard work 



out of designing players for inclusion in your own 
programs and it does help but I have always felt (and this 
applies to The Constructor also) that if you are sufficiently 
advanced to incorporate player- missile graphics in your 
own programs, you should have no problem in either 
desi gn i n g y ou r o w n p lay e rs or w ri ti ng a s i m pie utility to do 
it for you, Most programs of this nature just end up being 
fun to play with in their own right. 

At £15 for the disk version and £10 for the cassette this 
is way overpriced (as is The Constructor) and with 
ANALOG having just published a Player/ Missile 
Animator/F.ditor, I feel that the life of The Creator is 
limited. 



THE HELPER.... Supersoft .... 16k cassette .... 



The HELPER is an aid to Adventure players available 
from SuperSoft on cassette at £10. It enables you to load 
a cassette based machine code adventure into memory 
and then examine the listing for clues. It has a colourful 
introduction and a pleasant screen design but basically 
does no more than the listing on page 28 of issue 10 of 
PAGE 6. 

I am sorry to be so negative about TWO products from 



tile same company but I Teally feel that SuperSoft ought 
to think again. This would make an excellent magazine 
listing but as a commercial program it is just not worth 
£10. With the programs published by ANALOG and 
ANTIC becoming more and more sophisticated and the 
price of Atari ROM cartridges at £9.95, any programmer 
writing in BASIC needs to think long and hard about the 
commercial value of his program. 






Reviewed by Craig Fuller and Les Ellingham 



■ I Introducing the 

COMPUTER THAT'S 

REALLY PUT 

THE COMPETITION'S 

NOSE OUT 
OFJOW£ 



■»/ 



The ATARI 800 XL has got everything the Commodore 64 and other home computers have got. 

Plus a good deal more. And at £169 - with software prices starting at less than £10 - 

you don't have to pay through the trunk for it. Check foryourself ; 


: EATURES 


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KJI1.1-IN 

basic 


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socket 


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PRO. 


MKRMi 


: III 

TRACK CMP- 
AfilullEi 


□i*.GNasric 


MAXIM 

C0L0UBE 
(MM'.Bff M 
AT DUE HH 


1 SOUND" 

VOCES 


SI NCLAIR 5PEC T RUM PLUS 


























ACORN ELECTRON 


























COMMODORE £4 


























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-v - 

















A ATARI 8DDXL 




F=OHFURTH€RDETAILS.C0«TACry0ijBNfAR£ST ATARI DEALER BOOTS. CARRC«=OUH. CO-OP* CUftftvS. DIJlONS. GRANADA. L*S*WS, LEWIS'S, UTTUEWOOOS WAKfifJ. RLJMM LOWS. SILICA SHOP. SPtClHUM. 

VALLANCES, WIGFALL5. AND ALL OTHER 1 COMPUTER SHOPS. 



44 



PAGE 6 - issue 13 



views.. ..The Software Reviews.... The Software Reviews. 



PENGO .... Microdeal .... 16k cassette .... 1/2 players 



Reading the inlay card reveals that this version has all 
the features of the 'official' version and is commendable in 
that when two players are competing, you are offered the 
c ho ic e of e it he r us i n g on e s h ared or two joyst ic ks. So, at a 
glance, it would appear to be excellent value at £7 .95. Do 
not be deceived! When the game is loaded, the reason for 
the lower price becomes apparent. The graphics are 
simple, but not bad. Willy (the penguin) is actually quite 
good but the Snobees (sealions in this version) are very 
crude blobs so poorly implemented that if two blocks 
should pass, one will disappear! Also the appearance of 



the blobs is so sudden and random that you often lose a 
life before the game has even started because a blob 
materialised on top of you!. The musical accompaniment 
is interesting but plays rather too fast The general 
impression that I got was that Pengon was developed for 
the Spectrum and then cross- assembled onto an Atari 
with no effort made to make use of Atari's additional 
features. 

Pengon is better than many cheap Atari games but now 
that Atari's own Pengo is available at £9.95 the saving on 
this version is hardly worth considering. 

Chris Bone 



You may have noticed that we seldom review any of 
the latest American titles and sometimes, asin this issue, 
we do not have many reviews and have to include 
programs that are quite well known. The reason issimple 
- none of the major importers such as Centresoft or U.S. 
Gold send out copies of their programs for review, You 
don't often see them in the national magazines either. 
Most producers or distributors of Atari software have an 
incredible lack of understanding of the power of a review 
to sell a program. I suppose that thai is their loss hut in 
another way readers of the magazine lose out and it is a 
problem that ! am well aware of 

A distributor or producer directly benefits from sales 
generated by reviews, There is little reason for a retailer 
to give away review copies as he will not generally benefit 



from ALL of the sales but if any retailer reading this 
would like to send in the occasional (or regular) review 
copy of some of the American software^ I will ensure that 
they are given full credit as the source from which the 
program may be obtained 

/ am trying to broaden the scope of The Software 
Reviews To purchase programs myself would be pro- 
hibitively expensive and even hiring programs has its 
problems, I would like to set up a review panel of two or 
three readers who could be sent software to review but at 
the moment so little is received that it is not feasible. If 
you have any suggestions please let me know but in the 
meantime how about sending in some reviews of software 
you have bought? 



Reviewed by Chris Bone 



BULL ANTS continued from page 35 

3106 POKE A+B,PEEKCS7344+B) :NEHT B 

3110 POKE 756, CB 

3150 DL=PEEK(560)+256«PEEKt561) :P0KE D 

L, 240: FOR H=DL+7 TO DL+20 STEP 3:P0KE 

H, 134; NEXT H:ZB=CB*256 

3155 FOR Mr 5 32 48 TO 5325S:P0KE H,0:NEX 

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NEXT H:P0KE 532?7,3;P0KE 559,62 

3166 POKE 706 1 12! POKE 707, 12: POKE 5325 

8,0:POK£ 5325^,0 

3162 RESTORE 1000 :F0R K=l TO BlflEAD D; 
POKE ZB+1533+H,D:P0KE ZB+1647+M, D: NEXT 

M 

3163 FOR HI TO 8:READ D:P0KE ZB+1855+ 
H,D:PQKE ZB+l95l+W,D;NEXT H 

3170 POSITION 1,20:? tt6;"select 5PEE 

D = ";sp:for W=l TO 35:NEHT H 

3171 POSITION 1,21:? tt6;"SS33 START 

GAME* 1 

3175 IF PEEK(53279>=5 THEN G0SUB 10000 
:G0T0 3170 



AJ 



32: 



3183 IF PEEKC53279J 06 THEN 3175 

3191 POSITION 0,0:? t*6;"« \* 

Aj[jjjJJAAAAAAA A AAA AAAAAAA" 

3192 FOR H"5 TO 19 STEP 2:P05ITI0H 

* ? ttB; 1i AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA» ; COLOR 

PLOT INTfRN{>C0)*ie),H 

3193 PLOT INT CRND (01*10) +10, M; NEXT MSP 
OSITION 0,21:? H6;" AAAAAAAAA aaaaaaaa 
A ":? t*6; M 22IZZ AA COMpCO AA ZZZ7Z"J 

3195 POKE 54286, 132:H1=0:U1=22:H2=19:0 

2=22:C0L0R 247:PL0T HI, Vl: COLOR 216:Pt 

OT H2 , V2 : Al=6 : A2-200 : EGl=f : EG2=0 

3199 RN=INT(15Q«RNDC81}:E1=0:E2=0:N1=0 

; N2-0 : SOUND , 255 , , 4 J FF=0 i 51=0 : S2=0 : R 

ETURN 

4000 RETURN 

16000 SP=SP+1:IF SP>4 THEN SP=1 

10001 IF PEEKC53279J=7 THEN RETURN 

10002 GOTO 10001 






PAGE 6- issue 13 



45 



BACK ISSUES 





Issue 4 - includes Lunar V- Arcade Action - Merlin* Magic Square - 

Memory Mapped Screens - Basic Timing - liirah an Apple - Software 
Reviews ■ Disk Sort- First Steps 

Issue 5 - includes Target - Memory Mapped Screens - Squares - 
Arcade Action (Miner 2049 er) - Vertical P/M movement ■ Software 
Reviews -First Steps ■ Colour Selector - Line Lister 



All the above Issues now in short supply!! 



Issue 7 

Slots 

Seasons Greetings 

Grub* 

Going for a Drive 

BUGS 

Atari Basic Sourcebook 

Your Own Bulletin Board 

First Steps 

Largeprint 

Issue fl 

Wildwest 

Demo 21 

Sonar Search 

Placer Missile Graphics 

Graphics 8 Text 
Using MO FILL 

The Hardware Facts 
Return Key Modi; 
Make Your 410 Work! 

Issue 9 

Hungry I i orris 

Another Brick In the Wall 

Fine Scrolling. 

Understanding Strings 

Player Missile Graphics 2 

Text Draw 

MiniDos 

Adventure 

,.. and lots morel 

Issue 10 - Adventure Special 

Adventureland 

Scon Adams Interview 

Atari Adventures 

When All Else Falls 

House of Secrets 

Diamonds 
Spinner 
Screen Color 
...plus the usual features- 
Issue 1 1 

Grid 

Landscape 

Flags 

Colourflow 

PlauKr Missile Graphics 

What is USR 

Keset Routines 

Varsorl 1 

....plus the regular columns. 






Issue 12 also available 



Issues 1 2 3 & 6 SOLD OUT 

Issues 4 - 8 £1.00 inc. postage 
Issue 9 onwards £1.20 inc. postage 
Overseas readers please see page 3 



DUST COVERS 



Don't risk a breakdown of your precious equipment 
through dust and dirt or spilt coffee! Protect all of your 
equipment with a custom made dust cover. Natural 
PVC with a brown trim - easily folded away when your 
equipment is in use. Easily fitted with all peripherals, 
joysticks etc. in place, 

400/800/600XLy800XL 

410 Old Style Cassette* 

410 New Style Cassette 

1010 Cassette 

8 10/1 050 Disk Drive 

1020/1027 Printers 



£2.95 
£1.95 
£1.95 
£1.95 
£2.95 
£3.95 



*old style does not have a pause button 

Al so for a 1 1 popu lar prin ters ( n or ma 1 ly £3 .95 for sm al 1/ 
medium size and £4.95 for large printers) 



DISK/CASSETTE CARDS 



Keep track of youi 
programs easily and 
tidily. 

Disk insert cards. 
Pack of 25. 

Cassette inlay cards. 
Pack of 25. 

£1.00 each pack inc. 
postage. 




THE PAGE 6 LIBRARY 



A ua liable to subscribers on /y, the PAGE 6 LIBRARY 
is a fine collection of Public Domain programs from 

around the world. Hundreds of user-written programs 
(including machine-code) at very little cost, Available 
on disk only. Send a stamped addressed if you have 
not had current details. 



ORDER ALL ITEMS ON THIS PAGE FROM 

PAGE 6 MAGAZINE 

P.O.BOX 54, 

STAFFORD 

ST16 1DR 

Please make cheques payable to PAGE 6. 



46 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



SUNARO 



SOFTWARE 



800 XL 64k COMPUTER 


£165 I 


1050 DISK DRIVE 


£195 ; 


i 1010 RECORDER 


£ 34 i 


1020 COLOUR PRINTER 


£ 95 ; 


i 1027 LETTER QUALITY 


i 


PRINTER £245 



cass. 



disk 



The Hulk 
Sola Flight 
Warlok 
timet? Lee 
Dallas Quest 
Spitfire Ace 
JMato Commander 
Beach- Head 
Any English 
Software (9.95) 



32k 
48k 
32 k 
32k 



8.75 

13.25 

13-25 

1325 

N/A 

8.75 

8.75 

8.75 

875 



48 k 
48 k 
48k 
48 k 

48k 



15.75 
13.25 
13.25 
13.25 
13.25 
11,50 
11.50 
11.50 
8.75 



Send s.a.c 
Send cheque/ P.O. to f or n si&m 

SUNARO SOFTWARECP63) 
P.O.BOX 78. MACCLESFIELD, CHESHIRE, 

SK10 3PF 



W.E.E. ADD-ONS for ATARI 

CASSETTE INTERFACE ■ use with standard reorder instead of 1 010/4 1 ' i 
Remote Control jack and Audiu l/P Sidle whether fj pin DIN Of mio |fi<k 
plugi £19.95 

600XL RAM PACK simplypluginfor EXTRA 16kor32kof RAM 16k £52 

SPEECH SYNTHESISER allophone based infinite vocabulary us(?s2 J/S 
ports Complete with Demo software and manual E3B.95 

PRINTERFACE drives CENTRONICS type prtntcnwhli ATARI Basic/ As* / 
WnlCT cartridge commands. Uses 1 J/Sport. Cornpletewitbi lead and Auiobout 
rasseHf* software E33.9S 

IVicei ii>c VAT and p&p Largs SAE for details 

W.E.ELECTRONICS. 19. North Street, Emsworth, HANTS. 
Tel 02434 7761 3 Quote PAGE 6 



Don't forget to complete the 

Readers Poll and survey in this 

issue 

Please return it by 31st January 

1985 



CAMELOT continued from page 28 



1480 DATA 192,36,188,124,56,126,175,65 1580 

1485 DATA 6,0,0,0,0,0,6,0/0,6,0,8,0,0, 1585 

0,0,152,96,108,124,56,126,175,65 1550 

1490 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,6,0,0,0,0,0,8,0, 128 

0,0,192,36,188,124,56,126,175,65 1595 

1495 RETURN 1600 

1500 DATA 8,16,16,16,56,76,158,190,254 1605 

,124,56 1610 

1505 ren Mi** ma :r vniMj :Mtwi 231 

1510 RESTORE 1555 1615 

1515 HENTOP-PEEKtlflfc} : tRT0P-HEMT0P-4 1620 

1520 POKE 106,GRT0P;GRAPHIC5 1+16:CHR0 255 

M=PEEKC7S63*256 1625 

1525 CHRAM-GRT0P*256:POKE 756,GRT8P 1636 

1530 FOR N=0 TO 1Q23:P0KE CKRAM+N , PEEK 1835 

tCHROM+N) :HEKT H 1640 

1535 FOR K 1 TO 13:READ fl$:R=A5CCfl$) 1645 

1540 IF R<32 THEN R-R+64 1650 

1545 IF R<56 THEN IF R>31 THEN R=R-32 1655 

1550 FOR 1=0 10 7:READ A : A Hi -fk ; B-I+R* 1660 

8+256*6RTOP;P0KE B,A:NEXT I3HEKT K 129 

1555 DATA Y. 1665 

1560 DATA 91,254,155,253,55,78,54,8 1670 

1565 DATA 128 

1570 DATA 255,195,195,195,255,195,195, 1675 

195 1680 

1575 DATA Z 1685 



DATA 24,66,60,126,126,126,255,255 

DATA 

DATA 255,219,165,129,213,255,128, 

DATA U 

DATA 129,123,153,153,90,36,60,24 

DATA Y 

DATA 255,195,129,125,129,129,195, 

DATA G 

DATA 155,135,123,129,129,129,129, 

DATA N 

DATA 14,26,14,20,32,64,160,64 

DATA J 

DATA 102,24,126,189,36,90,125,125 

DATA D 

DATA 255,241,78,31,255,231,25,124 

DATA It 

DATA 240,222,213,211,145,245,159, 

DATA t, 

DATA 128,128,128,128,128,128,128, 

DATA K 

DATA 144,08,32,208,72,4,2,1 

RETURN D 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



47 



Music 



Music Maker 



Turn the keyboard of your Atari into a piano or organ 
with Music Maker! The program has long or short notes 
and is fully documented. All you need to play your Atari is 
there on the screen. Make music! 



REM MMMMMMXXMmCXMXMMKMMMXmtMMMMMMMM 

1 REM WW MUSIC MAKER WW 

2 REM ** BY WW 

3 REM WW COLIH FALLER ** 

4 REM MXXMMMMMttMMMMMX tt Ktt X MHItH MX ttW M tt Wtt 

5 REM 

6 POKE 731,1 

7 OPEN 81,4,0, "K^'rGOSUB H0BB 

8 POKE 82,0 

9 DIM LIS [80) ,L$C40),LCC4O] , A5{50) 

10 GRAPHICS G:COL0R ItSETCOLOR 2,9,0:5 
ETCOLOR 1,9,14;5ETC0L0R 4,9,0: POKE 752 
.1 

20 PLOT 10 ,78: DRAHTO 296, 78 : DRAHTO 296 
,130: DRAHTO 10 , 138 : DRAHTO 10,76 

21 FOR 0=10 TO 290 i PLOT Q r 79: DRAHTO Q, 
130:HEHT 

30 FOR A=10 TO 290 STEP 13 
35 PLOT A, 79: DRAHTO A, 130: COLOR 0:DRAH 
TO A+l, 138: DRAHTO A~l,130 
40 NEXT A:PL0T 295,130 
50 FOR A=79 TO llfl 

60 PLOT 19,A:DRAHT0 26,A:PL0T 32,A:DRA 
HTO 39,A:PL0T 58, A : DRAHTO 65,A:PL0T 71 
, A:DRAHT0 78, A: PLOT 84,A:DfiAHT0 91,0 

65 PLOT 110,A:DRAHTO 117,A:PL0T 123 , A : 
DRAHTO 130, A: PLOT 149, A: DRAHTO 156, A:P 
LOT 162,A:DRAHT0 169,A:PL0T 175, A 

66 DRAHTO 182, A? PLOT 2*1, A: DRAHTO 200, 
A: PLOT 214, A: DRAHTO 221, A: PLOT 240, A ID 
RAHTO Z47,A:PLDT 253,A:DRAUT0 260, A 

G7 PLOT 266, A: DRAHTO 273, A 
70 HEKT A: COLOR 1 

00 FOR A=19 TO 273 STEP 13: PLOT A, 110 J 
PLOT A+7,110:NFXT A 

90 PLOT 0,135:DRAUT0 7,135:DRAHT0 7,76 
:DRAHT0 299, 76 :DRAHT0 299, 135 : DRAHTO 3 
19,135:DRAHTO 319,16 : DRAHTO 0,10 
95 DRAHTO 6,135:PLOT 7 , 133 : DRAHTO 299, 
133 

97 PLOT 305,15: DRAHTO 305 ,69 : DRAHTO 23 
5,69:DSAUT0 235, 15 : DRAHTO 305, 15! FOR T 
=15 TO 69 STEP 3:PL€T 305, T 

98 DRAHTO 235, T: RENT T 

99 PLOT 10, 70: DRAHTO 230 , 70 : DRAHTO 230 
,45: DRAHTO 10, 45: DRAHTO 10, 70: GOTO 100 

08 

100 COLOR 1 



by Colin Faller 



BOMTEMPIE 



Q Ipiaho h 


E ORGAN R 


OFF 
ON 


LONG SHORT 


LONG SHORT 



vmurn 



PRESS START TO DISPLAY LETTERS 
PRESS SELECT FOR NO LETTERS 



200 L1$="A5DFGHJKL;+«ZXCUBHMU/ I> :F0R L 

=1 TO LENCL1$):L$=L1$CL,L) :LH=L*13:LY= 

150:G0SU8 240 

210 HEKT L 

220 L1$= M E1 234 56 789 0< >-=" rFOR L=l 

TO LEH(LiS) :L5=L1SCL,L);LX=L*13+6:LY= 
140;GQSUB 240 
230 NEXT L:GOT0 10108 
240 L$=L$C1,1) :LA-fi5C(LS) 

250 FOR L9=0 10 7 : LZ1=57008+LA*8+L9 :LZ 
1=PEEKCLZ11 

260 FOR L8=7 TO O STEP -1 ; LZ2=IHT <LZi/ 
2JSIF LZ2W2<LZ1 THEH PLOT LH+L8,LY+L9 
270 LZ1=LZ2:HEXT L8:HEKT L9 
280 RETURN 

800 Z-±35:C0L0R 1:GET ttl , X 
900 IF R=87 THEH 1=15 : 0=0 : P=~l : COLOR 
:PLOT 15,66: DRAHTO 194, 66: COLOR I '.PLOT 

55,66:DRAHT0 95,66 
910 IF X=81 THEN 1=15 :0=0 r P=~0 . 6 : COLOR 

OIPLOT 15,66:DRAHT0 194,66:COL0R l:PL 
8T 15,66: DRAHTO 58,66 

920 IF X=69 THER 1=0 : 0=15 : P=0 . 7:C0L0R 
fl:PLOT 15,66:DRAHT0 194,66:C0L0R 1 : PLO 
T 110,66:DRAHT0 144,66 
930 IF H=82 THEH 1=0 :0=15 :P-1 . 5 :COLOR 
0:PLOT 15,66:DRAHT0 194„66:C0LOR 1 : PLO 
T 150 ,66: DRAHTO 192,66 
1001 IF X=65 THEH A=10 : B=23 :C=25l : GOTO 

2000 
1882 IF X-83 THEN A=23 :8=36 :C=217 :GOTQ 

2000 
1603 IF X=68 THEH A=36 : B=49 : C=193: GOTO 

2000 

1004 IF X=70 THEH A=49:B=62 :C=182 :GOTO 
2060 

1005 IF X=71 THEH A=62 : B=75 : C=162 :GOT0 
2600 

1*06 IF X=72 THEH A75 :8=83 : C=144 :G0TO 
2008 continued overleaf 



48 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



MUSIC MAKER continued 



1187 IF X-74 THEN A=8S; 1=141 ;C=128:G0T 
2188 

1888 If H=75 THEN A=lll : 0=114 :C=121:6Q 

TO 2888 

1884 IF *=7& TflEH 6-114: 1=127 :C=188: CO 

TO 2888 

1118 IF H=59 THEM A=127;B=144;C=96:G01 

2888 

1811 IF K=4J THEN A=i46:B=l53:e=1l:60T 
2888 

1812 If 1=41 THEN A=lSJ:B=l«!C=81rG0T 
2888 

1811 If X=98 THEM 6=146 Jfl=179 :C=71:G0T 

2*86 

1114 If H=»8 THEN ft=179: 0=192 :C=S4:GflT 

2664 

1815 If H=67 THEN ft=192:B=2B5:£=60:tOT 

2600 

1116 IF H=06 THEN A=265:B=n6:i;=5J;tOT 

2888 

1817 IF H=66 THEN 0=218 ! 6=23 l:C=47i GOT 
2888 

18 18 IF X=7« THEN A=231:B=24CC=45:GOT 
2888 

1819 If H=77 THEM A=244:B=257:C=46:GOT 
2888 

1628 If H=44 THEM A=257:B=276:C=35:GeT 

2180 

1121 IF K-46 THEN A-278: 6=2)3 :C-31:G0T 

281* 

1822 IF H=47 THEM A=2«:B=2M:C-28:Gfl1 

2884 

1824 Z=73MF K=27 THEN A=19:B=2B:C=236 
:G0T0 2888 

1825 If X=41 THEM 6=12 :B=39:C=284 i GOTO 
2198 

1826 If X=58 THEN A:5B:B=6$;C=173:MT0 
2888 

1828 If K=51 THEN 6=71 :B=78:C=153:£OT0 



182? IF X=52 THEM A=84:B=91:C=1M:(OTO 

2888 

1838 IF K=H THEN 6=118 :B=117:C=114:GO 
TO 288B 

1831 IF J(=54 THEN 6=123:8=1 18 :C=182:tO 
T8 2848 

1832 IF X=55 THEN 6=149 :B=156:C=85: GOT 
D 2888 



1813 If K=S8 THEN 6=182: *:161 :C=7«: GOT 

ZBW 

1834 If H=57 THEN 6=175:4=162: C=HtGBT 

B 2444 

1435 IF Xz« THEN A=Z42:B=268:C=57:6ffI 

2886 

1116 If K=66 THEN 6=214 :B=221;C=54: GOT 

2686 

1837 IF 8=82 THEN 6=244:4=247 !C=42: GOT 

D 2880 

1638 IF X=4S THEN 6=253 :B=2i4:C=J7 )GOT 

2664 

1831 If X=61 THEN 6=266:4=273; 6=13! GOT 

2888 

1641 GOTO 866 

2BS8 PLOT A,Z:M«MT0 B,Z:F6t H=I T« 

5 TIP P:S6U» l,£,l$ t mWnCl U: COLOR 8:D 

N6HT0 A,Z:5fllJW 1,8 ,6,6: GOTO 868 

1 6686 H- 5 7 344 : S=PEEK f 88) +2 56WEEK (81): 

G8TB 16618 

18882 F06 1=8 TO 7 

16184 POKE S4Itf48+R*4fl4CjPEE«(tttIt6«81 

16688 NEXT URETUPJ 

16616 C=21:R=15 

16615 F6R T=l TO 8 

18828 REAB ft 

16625 DATA 14,47,46,52,17,45,48,41 

16638 G05II8 18882 
18635 t=£+l:NEXT T 
18837 C=2:B=5B 

16639 F« 1=1 TO 21 
16641 BE (it 6 

16641 MTfl 44,47,40,31,6,51,46,47,54,5 
2, 8, 8,44,47,46, 3916,51,46, 47,58, 51, 6,8 
,47,66 

16665 G05IIB 16882 
18647 C=Ctl;NEXT I 
18656 C=2:R=48 
16652 FOR T=l TO 26 
16654 READ A 

16856 BATA 41,8,41,41,13,46,47,8,6,55, 

0,6,17,8,4?,56,19,31,46,8,B J 56,6,47,38 

,36 

18458 G05UB 16842 

16666 C-C+lrNEHT T 

16065 PLOT 28,45:F0R A=l TO 18: READ T: 

REM U 

18476 IRAHT4 T, II: NEXT A 



16675 I6TA 28,56,16,56,81,56,86,45,88, 
56,184,56,184,45,114,78,184,56,125,56, 
125,45,125,56, 177, 56,177,45,177, 56 
1667B DATA 195,56,195,45,115,76 
16471 f ■ F1E« START Tt 0I5PLBY LETTE 
H5 PRE15 SELECT fOR N6 LETTER 

V 

1668B If PEEK (512 7 11 =6 THEN CO TO 184 
14481 If PEEK 1532791=5 TIEN GOTO 14104 
16883 GOTO 16684 

14144 ? If :? " PRESS 4H KEY T6 SM 
ITCH IT ON" 

14145 PLOT 225,47 rBflAMTB 159,47:ARAHT0 
199,»:6flAHT6 225,56:BRAHTB 225,47 

16118 GET SI, I 

10160 ? "I": COLOR 8: PLOT 225,4?:6RAHT0 
191,47 iBRAHTO 199,56:BfAHTB 225,M:M 
AKT8 225,47:C0LW 1:PL0T 225,57 
18174 BRAMTO 245,57 :BRAWTO 265,M;6RAH 
10 ZZSiBliORAMTO 225, 57: GOTO 24400 
11000 GRAPHICS 8: SET COL OR 2, 1,0: SET COL 
OR 4,9,|;3ETC6L0I 1,1,12 
11611 BL=PEEKC5641tZ56«PEEKf561)+4 
11424 POKE »L«2,7:POKE H**\li 
11634 P4SI1I6N 4,li? 'HUSicEHE?' 
11648 POSIT UN 18,2 J? "BY" 
11454 F63XTI44 13,1:? "C4LIN FALLER":? 

11468 ? " HUSIC MAKER Is i pitfto Kfilto 
ard disc an organ Keyboard. Bit* have 
Itag and short iwt#S," 
11440 ? :? " The Piano (for I cm H 
for short " 

11065 ! ■ Ihe Organ - E for 1609 R fo 
r short " 
11696 * u The first liM ftlMfc titys. 

OS E12 34547416 <}-= BH2 

■i 

11615 ? :? " The second lint *ite key 



6S4FHMKL ; "ZXCVBNHU 



11111 ? :? 
URL TAKE 
HE PIAN6" 
11124 GET U,T 
11134 RETURN 
24H6 G6T4 866 



FRE" SETLFh TC TfiFT 



IT 



44 SECONDS TO BRAN OUT T 



□ 



FIRST STEPS WILL BE BACK 
NEXT ISSUE! 

As this is a special edition for Christmas , Mark 
Hutchinson's First Steps column has had to be 
held over to next issue. Mark would still like you to 
write to him at P.O.BOX 10, BELFAST, BT10 ODB. 
Do it now! 



5T0P PRE55 



5TOP PRES5 



STOP Pt 



Nutty in issue 12 was a last 
ninute addition and being such a 
short listing it was not fully 
Checked but IT C6NH0T BE TYPED 
OS IT 15 5HOMN . 

Lines 17, 4a & 41 {possibly 
others need all coMMands to be 
abbreviated and the "ft* droppped 
frott all variables. For example 
where 50UND oo,Rfl,oo,QO appears 
type 50.0,8,8,8, it will run 
okay if you leave off all Q's. 



PAGES ■ Issue 13 



49 



A.S.Wootton B Sons, 

1 1 6, Edleston Road, 

Crewe, 

CW2 7HD 

Tel: 0270 2141 18 

Nothing but Atari. 
Authorised Service Cen- 
tre with fast turnaround 
of ail repairs. The usual 
range plus printers, joys- 
tick inserts, extension 
leads at very good prices. 
Try us for repairs or 
purchases. 

Channel One Computer 

Systems Ltd, 

174, High Street 

Hornchurch, 

Essex 

Tel: Hornchurch (04024) 

75613 

We have a large range of 
software plus hardware, 
printers etc. A good 
selection of American 
software including the 
more unusual such as 
Compilers, Editors. 

Assemblers etc. Ail for 
Atari. 

Home Entertainment 

Atari Center, 

212-213 Broad Street. 

Birmingham, 

B15 1AY 

Tel:021 643 9100 

Your dedicated Atari 
retailer for the best in the 
wonderful world of Atari, 
Mail Order Software 
Courier service - phone 
021 643 9100 or write 
FREEP0ST. Atari 

authorised Independent 
Service Centre. 

Norman Audio Ltd, 

51 , Fishergate, 

Preston, 

Lanes 

Tel. 0772 53057 

Authorised Atari Service 
Centre. Dealers in Atari 
products since 1978. 
Competitive prices and 
full after-sales back up. 
Personal service or Mail 
Order 



GOTO DIRECTORY 

The GOTO DIRECTORY is a guide to retailers who 
provide product support for Atari Many of these 
retailers will supply Mail Order so if you have trouble 
finding a supplier, turn to the GOTO DIRECTORY. 



Home Entertainment 

Atari Center, 

In- Store Shop r 

Lower Ground Floor, 

Owen Owen Store r 

Mander Centre, 

Wolverhampton 

Tel: Wolverhampton 

(0902) 71 1650 

Your in- store Atari Center 
specialising in Atari 
related products and 
including an Atari Service 
pick up point. 



Jennings Stores, 

248, Hertford Road, 

[Nr. Green Street) , 

Enfield, 

Middx. 

Tel. 01 804 1767 

very large range of 
English and American 
software available as well 
as the very latest in hard- 
ware. 

Micro byte, 

7 1 , Seaview Road, 

Liscard, 

Wallasey, 

Mersey side, L45 4QW 

Tel 051 630 6933 

Tired of high prices, poor 
service and hidden 
charges from other Mail 
Order retailers? Try us for 
the latest titles and U.S. 
mags. Visit or call anytime 
up to 7pm. 



Radford Hi-Fi Ltd, 

52, Gloucester Road, 

Bristol, 

Avon 

Tel:0272 428247 

We stock and suport a 
comprehensive range of 
products for Atari. Huge 
range of software from 
educational to small 
business (plus games of 
course}. Word process- 
ing packages. Printers. 
All for the best 
computer I 

Fox'* Computer Centre, 

38/40 Upper Parliament 

Street 

Nottingham 

Tel: 0602 414050 or 

411556 

We have the widest range 
of US. and U. K hardware, 
software, books, magazines 
and accessories in the area. 
Latest products, best prices. 
Send sae, for latest 'sale 
bin' lists. 



Trionic, 

1 44, Station Road, 

Harrow, 

Middx HA1 2RH 

TeL01 861 0036 

Software, peripherals, 
books and magazines. A 
comprehensive range for 
Atari. Try our late night 
shopping. Open Wa.mto 
8 p.m. Monday to Satur- 
day Give us a call or pay 
us a visit 



York Computer Centre 

7, Stonegate Arcade, 

York 

Tel: 0904 641862 

Top American and 
English software - over 
1000 titles i Hardware, 
books, magazines, 

accessories, If you need 
anything for your Atari, 
try Yorkshire's widest 
and most comprehensive 
range of products for your 
machine, 



Retailers who are interested in an entry in this feature 
are invited to contact the Editor on 0785 41 153. 



SOFTWARE 
PRODUCERS 

PROMOTE YOUR PRODUCTS 
AROUND THE WORLD 

Atari are compiling a worldwide database of every 
piece of software available for Atari machines in order 

to promote distribution at home and abroad Your 

software may be included on this database at no cost if 

you send product specifications to Jon Dean at ATARI 

CORP. (UK) Ltd,, Atari House, Railway Terrace, 

Slough, Berks, SL2 SBZ. 

Any retailers, distributors and the like may have 

access to the database for customer enquiries but at 

present it will not be available to the general public so 

unless you are in the trade make your enquiries 

through your local retailer. 



50 



TYPO 
TABLES 

BULL ANTS 

Variable checksum = 881 ]] j 



PAGE 6 - Issue 13 



MUSIC MAKER 

Variable checksum = 373762 



Line ma 
8 

hi 

211 

244 

283 

319 

415 

589 

695 

2M2 

2286 

3805 

3163 

3195 



range Code 
298 DF 



■ 218 
242 
282 
315 



5M 
69% 



BK 
XP 
S£ 
HF 

NX 
KM 
OK 



2888 UQ 

2180 KD 

3003 JG 

3162 IS 

3193 trr 

18882 KY 



Ufigth 
433 
588 
528 
513 
587 
59« 
547 
40? 
528 
541 
584 
534 
62? 
386 



Line 


ii» range Code 


Length 





- 2fl 


CM 


53? 


21 


-66 


Iff 


352 


47 


- 99 


OR 


578 


100 


- 980 


hg 


604 


910 


- 1802 


NT 


552 


1803 


- 1011 


LS 


549 


1112 


- J020 


m 


54? 


1021 


- 1038 


MO 


5«0 


1031 


- 103? 


CH 


54? 


184] 


- 10835 


NP 


382 


1B037 


- 18068 


20 


333 


10065 


- 18119 


EV 


514 


10148 


- 11058 


KN 


587 


11840 


- 20808 


WL 


478 



BGMB ESCAPE 



Variable checksum = 447544 



PLAYER ANIMATOR 



Variable checksum = 115497 



Lin* nu range Code Length 



Line mm range Code 



5 
55 
158 
238 

358 
(050 



58 

145 

228 

348 

1840 



GL 
SL 

NS 
MO 



1898 MM 



448 
478 
511 
512 
549 
362 



1 

60 

158 

350 

518 

719 

928 

1830 

1888 

1130 



- 58 

- 140 

- 308 
-500 

- 788 

- ?10 

- 1826 



FP 
HZ 

IJD 
EK 
VE 
EP 

KN 



1070 HL 



- H2% 

- 1188 



JN 
YD 



Length 
510 
515 
561 
448 
528 
527 
524 
557 
513 
474 



FLIGHT OF THE SWAN 1 CAMELOT 



Variable checksum = 61841 



Variable checks** - 1379911 



Lint 

8 


nu* range 
- 38 ' 


loae 
HX 


Lengrn 
547 


Line 
11 


nun range 
- 128 


Code 
BO 


Length 
385 


180 


- 158 


SX 


588 


125 


- 181 


PD 


444 


168 


- 228 


[8 


545 


185 


- 238 


HE 


519 


238 


- 283 


YC 


541 


235 


- 275 


CA 


438 


290 


- in 


■3A 


3? 


288 


- 325 


CX 


504 










338 


- 385 


MJ 


384 


FLIGH" 


SHAN 2 


390 


-445 


n 


486 










450 


- 585 


ZU 


500 


Variable checksum = 


812793 


518 


- 545 


Y2 


556 










558 


-595 


DB 


521 


Line 


nun range 


Code 


Length 


608 


-445 


EB 




9 


- 1048 


MR 


548 


458 


-495 


DC 


525 


1858 


- 1113 


PV 


548 


708 


- 745 


UJ 


550 


1114 


- 1140 


GG 


549 


758 


-795 


XO 


500 


1145 


- 1145 


PK 


588 


800 


- 845 


SF 


511 


1178 


- II?1 


VS 


545 


858 


- 895 


OH 


550 


1195 


- 1217 


IE 


558 


980 


-945 


Gt 


511 


121? 


- 1227 


IK 


537 


958 


-995 


NO 


558 


1228 


- 1234 


ss 


544 


1000 


- 1840 


UN 


500 


1235 


- 1241 


EU 


58? 


1845 


- 1085 


M 


509 


1242 


- 1260 


KM 


539 


1098 


- 1135 


LC 


550 


£278 


- 2040 


FG 


532 


1148 


- 1188 


Xft 


558 


2865 


Jfl*™ 


IJ 


588 


1185 


- 1225 


YX 


528 


3858 


- 3178 


JC 


488 


1238 


- £288 


TL 


519 


3188 


- 5016 


'J Li 


553 


1285 


- 1330 


OH 


532 


5817 


- 7000 


JZ 


556 


1335 


- 1388 


IC 


534 


7820 


- 7248 


PH 


457 


1385 


- 1438 


BJ 


522 


7250 


- 8865 


or 


545 


1435 


- 1445 


UK 


558 


8044 


- 38000 


RE 


397 


1470 


- 1525 


m 


455 










1530 


- 1585 


TJ 


352 










1598 


- 1645 


LY 


250 










1458 


- 1685 


GA 


143 



Utility 

RESCUE MISSION 

boot tape maker 

Cassette users will find that there is a long delay each 
time RESCUE MISSION from issue 12 is run as the 
program checks the data, unnecessarily, each time it is 
run. The following program will create a boot tape. 

Type in and CSAVE this listing, ensuring first that it is 
correctly typed RUN your original version of RESCUE 
MISSION and when the program asks you if you are 
"Ready to runV" answer N (No). Now CLOAD in the boot 
ta pe listin y a n d R UN it. You will be a ske d to place a tape in 
the cassette deck and when you press return a boot copy 
of RESCUE MISSION will be created on this tape. To play 
the game in future, you need only boot up the tape by 
holding START as you switch on the computer. 



by Geojfrey Thompson 



RESCUE MI55IOW BOOT TAPE K6KER 



10 REM 

28 FOR A-I53G TO 1569:READ D:POKE fl,D: 

MEXT A 

38 FOR MCM=28636 TO 28735! READ U:POKE 

MEM, U: NEXT MEM 

40 START=20696:FLEH=fiS28 

50 ? "INSERT TAPE, PRESS PLAY AMD RECQ 

RD" 

60 OPEN 1*1, 8, 128, "CI" 

70 H=U5RC1536, START ,FLEN): CLOSE 111 

00 IF HOi THEM 100 

SO ? "WRITE ERROR!": END 

100 END 

118 DATA 104,162,16,169,11,157*66,3,18 

4, 157, 69, 3, 104,157,68,3 

126 DATA 104,157,73,3,184,157,72,3,32, 

86, 228, 16, 4, 16S, 1,133, 212, SB 

130 DATA 0,51,216,80, 8, 81, 16?, 0,141, 47 

, 2 , 163 , 68 ,141,2, 211 , 163,8 , 141 , 231 

148 DATA 2,133,14,163,122,141,232,2,13 

3,15,163,6,133,10,169,81,133,11,24,36 □ 




• ♦ • 



THIS WAY — Just pop into your local computer store— and there, (it you can spot it behind the 
washing machines and hhfi's next to the paperbacks or even by the toiletries), is just what you're 
looking for: providing you want this week's top ten games tor the Spectrum, or Simons Basic or even 
a few top titles for Atari. 

There's a safes assistant who might pay you some attention and, depending on their preference; 
wiil advise you on the superb graphics of the Spectrum, the Beeb's massive memory capabilities, the 
ease of programming a Commodore or how well the Otic will match your decor 'And there's £10 off 
this box over here!' 

\bu do need to be an enthusiast to put up with it! 



Hamefy 
Entertainment 




212-213 
Center Brosti Street 




OR, THIS WAY 

Certainly in the West Midlands, there's another way. Your Home Entertainment 
Atari Center in Broad Street Birmingham. You'll be well-served by knowledgeable Atari 
enthusiasts, backed by the widest range of Atari associated products that only a 
solus-retailer can supply. Hardware, peripherals, software, books and magazines- 
special imports— all for Atari— and we're an Atari authorised independent Service 
Centre too. 

In the North -West, there's an Atari Center in Miller Arcade, Preston. And now in 
Wolverhampton, an "in-store" Atari Center at the Owen Owen store (lower ground floor) 
in the Mander Centre. 

If you're not in these areas, we can offer you an efficient Mail Order service thafs only 
a phone calf away Backed with the same expertise, the same dedication to Atari— the 
same wish to serve you. ______ — 

We can't sell you a washing machine, but I pup (^ I£ ATARI 

then no-one can do everything well. Thafs why *_^n C^ 1 __ . 

we specialise. 

Home 
Entertainment 



PRICES NOW! 



fr mm* CENTERS 



212-213, Brood Street, Birmingham. B15 1AY, 
TELEPHONE: 021 -643-9100 

MAIL ORDER: Tel 021-643 9100 or 
FREEPOST to the Birmingham Center, 



NOW OPEN IN WOLVERHAMPTON 

ATARI Center at Owen Owen, Mander Centre, 
Wolverhampton. (0902) 711650 



Home EntertainmBM Ltd., is an independent dealer in Atari and 
associated products. ATARI" is a registered trade mark of ATARI INC. 



From English Software. 
The supreme Atari challenge. 

Only £9.95. ~~ 



Atari 400, 800 & XL 
COMPATIBLE 

For Atari owners, English 
Software programs art' the finest. 

Our large and unique range ut 
titles will stretch your imagination to 
the limit and beyond. 

The needle-sharp graphics, 
vibrant colours and super-smooth 
action will really test your skills- 
English Software is the leading 
independent for Atari -nobody does it 
better- 
Arid we're fast making our pro- 
grams compatible for Commodore 64. 
Order direct by using the coupon 
(or telephone the Sales Hot Line on 
061-835 1356 , quoting your Access or 
Visa number). 

Find us at Boots, 
Laskys, Greens 
and all good 
software dealers. 

* IS il| i-.li ~-»i4l'ji.i ir [ir-i|>rdiiii\.iir i|,Ii3j*.«.miiJiiip .■- :h:' I rt'li-'!i **■ *l vt.nr 

TVrm* 'A Trading uu.it I af wttirft M9 HV<lfctW# on reqjUtPI 1 




DIAMONDS IGK CasseiiWDisk bv Simon Hunt. 
Chase the Great While Diamond in ENGLISH 
SOFTWARE'S best -sell In a mining game! 16 levels of 
play make liFe very difficult indeed! 



JET- BOOT JACK 32 KCasse tie/Disk hv Jan Williams 
JHT BOOT J ACK. space-age joMer. takes WHI on a 

thase through the vinyl vaults of the PRESSING 

PLANT! 





UAN STRIKES BACK I6K CuKtte/Dlak by Simon 

J I Jin. hi [ he Jlc-s t sequel to the top-selling 
DIAMONDS, Brian the Blob has stolen the GREAT 
DIAMOND and hidden it in the deepest vault. 



BATTV HI ,'JLDERS 1 6K Cassette*' Disa hv Manuel D 
tahallcm. Play BATTY BUILDERS and indulge 
yourself in one uf the best non-violent constructive 
computer game programs ever written. 




THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD LuK 
Cassette/Disk bv Tim Huntington. Join ROHIN HOOD 
m his. efforts to thwart the SHERIFF'S MEN. rescue 

the bags of S! Ever and plant kisses on the lips ul lilt- 
beautiful MAID MARIAN! 



CITADEL WARRIOR 12 K Cassette. Disk by Jon 
Mavcrs and Ken Famcn. The nations of the world are 
a1 the mercy ol D-E-A-T-H (Daiiardty Earthifcidc. 
Anarchists and Terrorists against Happiness.) They are 
out to destroy the security CITADELS with their 
CYCLOTRON BOMBS' 



NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTERS 16K CaaMtte/Diai by 
Mark J Taylor and MLthat I Hedley. Designed hy Ralph 
f rum in. Our 1st multi-screen arcade adventure takes 

you beneath the ofean's u axes in search ol 
NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTKKS. held captive by (he evil 
Sea Serpent ! 



ACE. THE ATARI CASSETTE 
ENHANCER hy Jun Williams 
Cassette features include: Names 
cassettc-savcd pro^nmiv. St'^ithi-s Lind 
k>,itk named prugram. Displays contents el 
cassette un screen. Verify facility. Lists 
variables. Automatic line numbering. 
Renumbers any basic prugraii] quickly 
Creates binary files on lape. Plus many. 
many more features. Usa l s only 4K < »l 
memory maximum! £7.95 



PROGRAMMERS WANTED 

We're always on the lookout for new 
prngrumrnLTs. Li you can work to the 
English Software standard of quality, we'll 
reward yt>u by marketing your programs 
across Europe and USA! Contact us today 




OH U N Ed LRG LI N K WORD L A NG U AGF S YSTF.\V 
t.l.R.U AN MK Cashelte/Disk Desip ned by Dr Michael 

MGrunebcrp. Program by Steven A Riding. With the 
use ot a uniqLie blend ol tistml imagery Jlnu psychology. 

it will leath you the basic grammar and moivtH&n J50 
German words in only 10 hours! Supplied complete 
with separate audio pronunciation tape. £12,95 



THE ATARI t.RAE'tllCS W17.ARI>! 16K LasRCllc/32 K 
Disk by Steven A Riding. THE ATARI GRAPHf.CS 
WIZARD introduces you to the wonderful world of 
ATARI PLAYER (SPRITE) and CHAR ACT HK 
G RAPH fCS 1 Written totally in Maeh inc Code, it 
contains: PLAYER EDITOR (SPRITEMAKFR); 
< hi A R ALTER EDITOR. MULTICOLOUR 
CHARACTER EDITOR 




To English Suit wtui.' CoiTipiinv, Box 43, \luru lu-sli'i M60.3AO The Adventures (»| Rubin Hi,**! 



I Pitas*: rush me the lul lowing on i asse 

I endure chL^que-'PO/Cash lor" t 

I debit my Access/ Visa No 

Nellie 



tte.'disk. Tkk box 
(post-free) or please 



Addie^s 



THE POWT-B OF EXCITEMENT 

The English Software Cumpwnv, Box 43, 
Manchester M60 3AD Tradi: Enquh nwTd: 061-835 



ACE 

Diamonds 

l>:m Strikes Back 

Citadel Warrior 

( jrunebers Gcntum 

Jet Bool Jack 

fatly Boildcra 

Neptune's Daughter*) Ai.ti i 



I I 
□ 

r: 

I I 



i 9 95 ■ 

£ 7.9=1 ■ 

t 9.951 

I 9.95. 

£ 9.9F | 



I £12.95' 



□ 



35S 



I 

1^ 



Bk^i^B| L ^ gJ Neptune 's I ).iu filters t U.V1 M 

P^C^^JfBlBV Ill.'.APLlll (.ULiftflu'. WLMIni 



I. U.4 = | 

L 9.95 1 

E 9.95, 

i 7 .95 I 
L 9.95.